HSE Statistics cross iconNon-fatal injuries at work in Great Britain

Important Note

The coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and the government’s response has impacted recent trends in health and safety statistics published by HSE. More details can be found in our report on the impact of the coronavirus pandemic on health and safety statistics.

441,000

Workers sustained a non-fatal injury according to self-reports from the Labour Force Survey in 2020/21 (LFS)

51,211

Employee non-fatal injuries reported by employers in 2020/21 (RIDDOR)

Workplace injuries and ill health Estimated working days lost
Injuries with up to 7 days absence 339000
Injuries with over 7 days absence 102000

Non-fatal injuries to employees by most common accident kinds

(Non-fatal injuries reported under RIDDOR 2020/21, includes those accident kinds that account for 5% or more of the total)

Non-fatal injuries reported under RIDDOR 2020/21 where accident kinds account for 5% or more of the total, Slips, trips or falls on same level 33%, Handling, lifting or carrying 18%, Struck by moving object 10%, Acts of violence 8% and falls from height 8%

Type of injury Percentage of injuries
Slips, trips or falls on same level 33
Handling, lifting or carrying 18
Struck by moving object 10
Acts of violence 8
Falls from a height 8

Rate of self-reported workplace non-fatal injury

(LFS: Estimated rate per 100,000 workers)

Prior to the coronavirus pandemic, the rate of self-reported non-fatal injury to workers showed a generally downward trend. In 2020/21 the rate was lower than the 2018/19 pre-coronavirus level.

Year Self-reported workplace non-fatal injury Lower Bound Upper Bound
2000/01 3980 3810 4150
2001/02 3780 3620 3940
2002/03 3800 3630 3960
2003/04 3480 3320 3650
2004/05 3210 3050 3370
2005/06 3030 2870 3190
2006/07 3100 2940 3260
2007/08 2850 2700 3000
2008/09 2570 2410 2720
2009/10 2580 2430 2740
2010/11 2130 1970 2280
2011/12 2090 1940 2240
2012/13 2240 2090 2400
2013/14 2130 1980 2290
2014/15 2030 1880 2180
2015/16 2030 1870 2190
2016/17 1970 1810 2130
2017/18 1770 1620 1920
2018/19 1830 1680 1990
2019/20 2160 1980 2340
2020/21 1410 1250 1570

Trend statements

  • Prior to the coronavirus pandemic, the rate of self-reported non-fatal injury to workers showed a generally downward trend. In 2020/21 the rate was lower than the 2018/19 pre-coronavirus level.

Rate of employer-reported non-fatal injury

(RIDDOR: Rate per 100,000 employees)

Chart shows the rate of employer-related non-fatal injury in Great Britain since 1986/87

Year Employer reported non-fatal injury rate
Rates for the period 1986/87 to 2011/12 0 25
1986/87 620
1987/88 608
1988/89 605
1989/90 602
1990/91 588
1991/92 570
1992/93 540
1993/94 519
1994/95 532
1995/96 494
1996/97 510
1997/98 517
1998/99 497
1999/00 482
2000/01 466
2001/02 448
2002/03 443
2003/04 456
2004/05 441
2005/06 425
2006/07 409
2007/08 391
2008/09 374
2009/10 351
2010/11 335
2011/12 319
2012/13 318
2013/14 307
2014/15 297
2015/16 277
2016/17 267
2017/18 265
2018/19 258
2019/20 242
2020/21 185

Trend statements

Prior to the coronavirus pandemic, the rate of non-fatal injury to employees reported by employers showed a downward trend. The rate fell further in 2020/21, though more sharply than previously seen.

Notes

The Labour Force Survey (LFS) provides the most complete estimate of workers sustaining a non-fatal injury at work, regardless of whether time off work was taken (based on self-reports by workers). 

This data is supplemented with reports by employers of workplace injuries under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR).  RIDDOR requires employers to report certain workplace non-fatal injuries, generally the more serious (those that result in more than 7 days absence from work or specified on a pre-defined list of injuries). It is known that employers substantially under-report these non-fatal injuries: the level of overall employer reporting of RIDDOR defined non-fatal injuries to employees is estimated at around a half. Any comparisons between different subsets within RIDDOR data (e.g. comparisons between one industrial sector and another) need to take account of the possibility of there being markedly different reporting levels in the subsets being compared.

LFS data has several advantages over RIDDOR including: data are available for all workplace injuries, irrespective of time off work; they are not subject to the substantial under-reporting that affects RIDDOR; and they are not affected by changes in legislation.  However, RIDDOR provides greater richness in terms of details about the injury sustained.
More information on non-fatal injuries at work

Updated 2021-12-08