This website uses non-intrusive cookies to improve your user experience. You can visit our cookie privacy page for more information.

Social media

Javascript is required to use HSE website social media functionality.

Frequently asked questions on first aid

These FAQs are aimed at employers, dutyholders, first-aiders and training organisations.

Please note that FAW refers to ‘first aid at work’ and EFAW to ‘emergency first aid at work’.

Employers

Appointed persons

What is an appointed person?

When an employer's first-aid needs assessment indicates that a first-aider is unnecessary, the minimum requirement is to appoint a person to take charge of first-aid arrangements. The roles of this appointed person include looking after the first-aid equipment and facilities and calling the emergency services when required. They can also provide emergency cover, within their role and competence, where a first-aider is absent due to unforeseen circumstances (annual leave does not count).

Do appointed persons need to undertake first-aid training?

To fulfil their role, appointed persons do not need first-aid training. However, emergency first-aid training courses are available.

Automated external defibrillators

What training is required for using a defibrillator?

First aid at work (FAW) courses do not cover the use of defibrillators. If you decide to provide a defibrillator in your workplace, it is important that those who may use it are appropriately trained. HSE does not specify the content of this training. However, whoever you select to deliver this training must be competent. Information on training is available from the Resuscitation Council (UK).

Electric shock

What is the first-aid treatment for an electric shock?

See HSE's poster:

First-aid box

What should a first-aid box in the workplace contain?

The decision on what to provide will be influenced by the findings of the
first-aid needs assessment. As a guide, where work activities involve low hazards, a
minimum stock of first-aid items might be:

  • a leaflet giving general guidance on first aid (for example, HSE's leaflet Basic
    advice on first aid at work
    );
  • 20 individually wrapped sterile plasters (assorted sizes), appropriate to the type
    of work (hypoallergenic plasters can be provided if necessary);
  • two sterile eye pads;
  • two individually wrapped triangular bandages, preferably sterile;
  • six safety pins;
  • two large sterile individually wrapped unmedicated wound dressings;
  • six medium-sized sterile individually wrapped unmedicated wound dressings;
  • at least three pairs of disposable gloves (for advice on latex gloves please see Selecting latex gloves)

This is only a suggested contents list.

Employers may wish to refer to British Standard BS 8599 which provides further information on the contents of workplace first-aid kits.

Whether using a first-aid kit complying with BS 8599 or an alternative kit, the contents should reflect the outcome of the first-aid needs assessment.

It is recommended that you don't keep tablets and medicines in the first-aid box.

More advice is given in HSE's free leaflet: First aid at work: your questions answered.

How often should the contents of first-aid boxes be replaced?

Although there is no specified review timetable, many items, particularly sterile ones, are marked with expiry dates. They should be replaced by the dates given and expired items disposed of safely. In cases where sterile items have no dates, it would be advisable to check with the manufacturers to find out how long they can be kept. For non-sterile items without dates, it is a matter of judgement, based on whether they are fit for purpose.

First-aid equipment

What first-aid equipment should be provided?

Once an assessment of first-aid needs has been carried out, the findings can be used to decide what first-aid equipment should be provided in the workplace. The minimum requirement is a suitably stocked first-aid box, see FAQ 'First-aid box'. The assessment may indicate that additional materials and equipment are required such as scissors, hypoallergenic microrpous adhesive tape, disposable aprons and individually wrapped, moist wipes. They may be put in the first-aid box or stored separately.

If mains tap water is not readily available for eye irrigation, at least one litre of sterile water or sterile normal saline (0.9%) in sealed, disposable containers should be provided. When the seal has been broken, containers should not be kept for reuse. Containers should also not be used beyond their expiry date.

First aid for the public

Do I need to make first-aid provision for members of the public?

The Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 do not require employers to provide first aid for members of the public. However, many organisations such as schools, places of entertainment, fairgrounds and shops provide a service for others. HSE strongly recommends that employers include the public in their first-aid needs assessment and make provision for them.

Do the Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 cover large events such as concerts?

Only in so far as employers are responsible for providing first aid for their employees. At events such as concerts, it is the event organiser's responsibility to ensure the availability of medical, ambulance and first-aid assistance as appropriate for all those involved.

First aid for travelling, remote and lone workers

I have employees who travel regularly or work elsewhere, what should I do about first-aid provision for them?

Employers are responsible for meeting the first-aid needs of their employees working away from the main site. The assessment of first-aid needs should determine whether:

  • those who travel long distances or are continuously mobile should carry a personal first-aid box; and
  • employees should be issued with personal communicators/mobile phones.

First aid in schools

How do the Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 relate to first-aid provision in schools?

  • Employers are responsible for the provision of appropriate first-aid equipment, facilities and first-aid personnel in respect of their employees – this includes schools, as they are workplaces. Although the Regulations do not require employers to provide first aid for anyone else, HSE strongly encourages employers to consider non-employees when carrying out their first-aid needs assessment and to make provision for them.

First aid kits and British Standard 8599

There is a British Standard BS 8599 for first aid kits, it is not a regulatory requirement under the Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 to purchase kits that comply with this standard. Instead the contents of a first aid box is dependent on an employers first aid needs assessment.

This means for employers following a needs assessment the options are:

1. Within your workplace you have access to a first aid kit whose contents complies with BS 8599 and matches or exceeds the findings from your needs assessment;

or

2. Within your workplace you have access to a first aid kit whose contents matches the findings from your needs assessment but does not comply with the requirements of BS 8599.

First-aid rooms

Do I need to provide a room for first aid?

You should provide a suitable first-aid room(s) where your first-aid needs assessment identifies this as necessary.

What should be kept in the first-aid room?

Typical examples of the equipment and facilities a first-aid room may contain are:

  • a sink with hot and cold running water;
  • drinking water and disposable cups;
  • soap and paper towels;
  • a store for first-aid materials;
  • foot-operated refuse containers, lined with yellow, disposable clinical waste bags or a container suitable for the safe disposal of clinical waste;
  • an examination/medical couch with waterproof protection and clean pillows and blankets;
  • a chair;
  • a telephone or other communication equipment; and
  • a record book for recording incidents attended by a first-aider or appointed person.

Who should have access to the first-aid room?

If possible, the room should be reserved specifically for providing first aid and a designated person (first-aider or appointed person) should be given responsibility for supervising it. The room should be easily accessible to stretchers and be clearly signposted and identified.

First-aid signs

What signs should I have?

All first-aid boxes should have a white cross on a green background. Similarly, first-aid rooms should be easily identifiable by white lettering or a white cross on a green background.

Where should I put them?

Signs should be placed where they can be seen (not obstructed from view) and easily identified.

First-aiders

How many first-aiders do I need?

The findings of your first-aid needs assessment will help you decide how many first-aiders are required. There are no hard and fast rules on exact numbers and you will need to take into account all the relevant circumstances of your particular workplace. See the table in the leaflet First aid at work assessment tool

Can legal action be taken against first-aiders?

It is very unlikely that any action would be taken against a first-aider using the first-aid training they have received. HSE cannot give any specific advice on this issue as it does not fall within HSE's statutory powers.

It is recommended that you seek legal advice, or advice from your employer's insurance brokers on whether their policies cover first-aiders' liability.

Infection

When dealing with a casualty, how can the risk of cross-infection be minimised?

Training courses for first-aiders in the workplace highlight the importance of preventing cross-infection in first-aid procedures.

Particular concerns have been raised about the possibility of first-aiders becoming infected by a blood-borne virus (including HIV, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus) while performing first aid. HSE's free leaflet, Blood-borne viruses in the workplace , addresses this issue and advises on steps that can be taken to reduce the risk of infection.

Record keeping

Do I need to record incidents requiring the attention of a first-aider?

It is good practice to provide your first-aiders and appointed persons with a book in which to record incidents they attend. The information can help you identify accident trends and possible areas for improvement in the control of health and safety risks. It can be used for reference in future first-aid needs assessments. The record book is not the same as the statutory accident book though the two might be combined.

Employers, self-employed people and those in control of premises have a duty to report some accidents and incidents at work under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR). Further information is given at RIDDOR.

What information should be recorded?

Useful information to record includes:

  • the date, time and place of the incident;
  • the name and job of the injured or ill person;
  • details of the injury/illness and what first aid was given;
  • details about what happened to the person immediately afterwards (eg went back to work, went home, went to hospital); and
  • the name and signature of the first-aider or person dealing with the incident.

Who is responsible for keeping the records?

It is usually the first-aider or appointed person who looks after the book. However, employers have overall responsibility.

Tablets and medication

Are first-aiders allowed to give tablets and medication to casualties?

First aid at work does not include giving tablets or medicines to treat illness. The only exception to this is where aspirin is used when giving first aid to a casualty with a suspected heart attack, in accordance with currently accepted first-aid practice. It is recommended that tablets and medicines should not be kept in the first-aid box.

Some workers carry their own medication that has been prescribed by their doctor (eg an inhaler for asthma). If an individual needs to take their own prescribed medication, the first-aider's role is generally limited to helping them to do so and contacting the emergency services as appropriate.

Medicines legislation restricts the administration of injectable medicines. Unless self-administered, they may only be administered by or in accordance with the instructions of a doctor (eg by a nurse). However, in the case of adrenaline there is an exemption to this restriction, which means in an emergency a layperson is permitted to administer it by injection for the purpose of saving life.

When can an Epipen be used?

  • The use of an Epipen to treat anaphylactic shock is an example of an exemption from the restriction imposed by the medicines legislation. Therefore, first-aiders may administer an Epipen if they are dealing with a life-threatening emergency involving a casualty who has been prescribed and is in possession of an Epipen, and where the first-aider is trained to use it.

What about the offshore industry?

The use of tablets and medication in the context of first-aid provision in the offshore industry is dealt with separately (see sections on offshore work under 'Training').

First aid provision by employers

What are the penalties for not meeting first aid at work regulations?

Breaches of the Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 are dealt with proportionately. Enforcement action could include the issuing of a notice or prosecution if the circumstances warrant it.

Is annual refresher training a mandatory requirement?

No. It is strongly recommended to employers to help trained first aiders maintain their basic skills and keep up to date with any changes in first-aid procedures.

Employees

What does my employer have to do on first aid?

Your employer is expected to have:

  • completed a first-aid needs assessment;
  • ensured that there is either an appointed person to take charge of first-aid arrangements or, if necessary, there are appropriate numbers of suitably trained first-aiders;
  • ensured their are adequate facilities and a suitable stocked first-aid box;
  • provided you with information about the first-aid arrangements.

This page has some answers to specific questions regarding employees and first aid. If you have any other queries, please refer to the frequently asked questions (FAQs) for employers, first-aiders and appointed persons or training organisations.

Appointed persons

What is an appointed person?

When an employer's first-aid needs assessment identifies that a first-aider is not necessary, the minimum requirement is to appoint a person to take charge of first-aid arrangements. The role of this appointed person includes looking after the first-aid equipment and facilities and calling the emergency services when required. They can also provide emergency cover, within their role and competence, where a first-aider is absent due to unforeseen circumstances (annual leave does not count).

Do appointed persons need to undertake first-aid training?

To fulfil their role, appointed persons do not need first-aid training. However, emergency first-aid training courses are available.

Can appointed persons perform first aid, eg cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)?

Appointed persons are not first-aiders and should not attempt to give first aid for which they have not been trained.

Automated external defibrillators

What training is required for using a defibrillator?

First aid at work (FAW) courses do not cover the use of defibrillators. If you decide to provide a defibrillator in your workplace, it is important that those who may use it are appropriately trained. HSE does not specify the content of this training. However, whoever you select to deliver this training must be competent. Information on training is available from the Resuscitation Council (UK).

Electric shock

What is the first-aid treatment for an electric shock?

See HSE's poster:

First-aid box

What should a first-aid box in the workplace contain?

The decision on what to provide will be influenced by the findings of the
first-aid needs assessment. As a guide, where work activities involve low hazards, a
minimum stock of first-aid items might be:

  • a leaflet giving general guidance on first aid (for example, HSE's leaflet Basic
    advice on first aid at work
    );
  • 20 individually wrapped sterile plasters (assorted sizes), appropriate to the type
    of work (hypoallergenic plasters can be provided if necessary);
  • two sterile eye pads;
  • two individually wrapped triangular bandages, preferably sterile;
  • six safety pins;
  • two large sterile individually wrapped unmedicated wound dressings;
  • six medium-sized sterile individually wrapped unmedicated wound dressings;
  • at least three pairs of disposable gloves (for advice on latex gloves please see Selecting latex gloves)

This is only a suggested contents list.

Employers may wish to refer to British Standard BS 8599 which provides further information on the contents of workplace first-aid kits.

Whether using a first-aid kit complying with BS 8599 or an alternative kit, the contents should reflect the outcome of the first-aid needs assessment.

It is recommended that you don't keep tablets and medicines in the first-aid box.

More advice is given in HSE's free leaflet: First aid at work: your questions answered.

How often should the contents of first-aid boxes be replaced?

Although there is no specified review timetable, many items, particularly sterile ones, are marked with expiry dates. They should be replaced by the dates given and expired items disposed of safely. In cases where sterile items have no dates, it would be advisable to check with the manufacturers to find out how long they can be kept. For non-sterile items without dates, it is a matter of judgement, based on whether they are fit for purpose.

First aid for travelling, remote and lone workers

What should employers do for employees who travel regularly or work elsewhere?

Employers are responsible for meeting the first-aid needs of their employees working away from the main site. The assessment of first-aid needs should determine whether:

  • those who travel long distances or are continuously mobile should carry a personal first-aid box; and
  • employees should be issued with personal communicators/mobile phones.

Infection

When dealing with a casualty, how can the risk of cross-infection be minimised?

Training courses for first-aiders in the workplace highlight the importance of preventing cross infection in first-aid procedures.

Particular concerns have been raised about the possibility of first-aiders becoming infected by a blood-borne virus (including HIV, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus) while performing first aid. HSE's free leaflet, Blood-borne viruses in the workplace, addresses this issue and advises on steps that can be taken to reduce the risk of infection.

Tablets and medication

Are first-aiders allowed to give tablets and medication to casualties?

First aid at work does not include giving tablets or medicines to treat illness. The only exception to this is where aspirin is used when giving first aid to a casualty with a suspected heart attack in accordance with currently accepted first-aid practice. It is recommended that tablets and medicines should not be kept in the first-aid box.

Some workers carry their own medication that has been prescribed by their doctor (eg an inhaler for asthma). If an individual needs to take their own prescribed medication, the first-aider's role is generally limited to helping them to do so and contacting the emergency services as appropriate.

Medicines legislation restricts the administration of injectable medicines. Unless self-administered, they may only be administered by or in accordance with the instructions of a doctor (eg by a nurse). However, in the case of adrenaline there is an exemption to this restriction, which means in an emergency a layperson is permitted to administer it by injection for the purpose of saving life.

When can an Epipen be used?

The use of an Epipen to treat anaphylactic shock is an example of an exemption from the restriction imposed by medicines legislation. Therefore, first-aiders may administer an Epipen if they are dealing with a life-threatening emergency involving a casualty who has been prescribed and is in possession of an Epipen, and where the first-aider is trained to use it.

What about the offshore industry?

The use of tablets and medication in the context of first-aid provision in the offshore industry is dealt with separately (see sections on offshore work under 'Training').

First-aider/Appointed person

Appointed persons

What is an appointed person?

When an employer's first-aid needs assessment identifies that a first-aider is not necessary, the minimum requirement is to appoint a person to take charge of first-aid arrangements. The role of this appointed person includes looking after the first-aid equipment and facilities and calling the emergency services when required. They can also provide emergency cover, within their role and competence, where a first-aider is absent due to unforeseen circumstances (annual leave does not count).

Do appointed persons need to undertake first-aid training?

To fulfil their role, appointed persons do not need first-aid training. However, emergency first-aid training courses are available.

Can appointed persons perform first aid, eg cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)?

Appointed persons are not first-aiders and should not attempt to give first aid for which they have not been trained.

Automated external defibrillators

What training is required for using a defibrillator?

First aid at work (FAW) courses do not cover the use of defibrillators. If an employer decides to provide a defibrillator in your workplace, it is important that those who may use it are appropriately trained. HSE does not specify the content of this training and organisations providing it do not need HSE approval. Information on training is available from the Resuscitation Council (UK).

Electric shock

What is the first-aid treatment for an electric shock?

See HSE's poster:

First-aid box

What should a first-aid box in the workplace contain?

The decision on what to provide will be influenced by the findings of the
first-aid needs assessment. As a guide, where work activities involve low hazards, a
minimum stock of first-aid items might be:

  • a leaflet giving general guidance on first aid (for example, HSE's leaflet Basic
    advice on first aid at work
    );
  • 20 individually wrapped sterile plasters (assorted sizes), appropriate to the type
    of work (hypoallergenic plasters can be provided if necessary);
  • two sterile eye pads;
  • two individually wrapped triangular bandages, preferably sterile;
  • six safety pins;
  • two large sterile individually wrapped unmedicated wound dressings;
  • six medium-sized sterile individually wrapped unmedicated wound dressings;
  • at least three pairs of disposable gloves (for advice on latex gloves please see Selecting latex gloves)

This is only a suggested contents list.

Employers may wish to refer to British Standard BS 8599 which provides further information on the contents of workplace first-aid kits.

Whether using a first-aid kit complying with BS 8599 or an alternative kit, the contents should reflect the outcome of the first-aid needs assessment.

It is recommended that you don't keep tablets and medicines in the first-aid box.

More advice is given in HSE's free leaflet: First aid at work: your questions answered.

How often should the contents of first-aid boxes be replaced?

Although there is no specified review timetable, many items, particularly sterile ones, are marked with expiry dates. They should be replaced by the dates given and expired items disposed of safely. In cases where sterile items have no dates, it would be advisable to check with the manufacturers to find out how long they can be kept. For non-sterile items without dates, it is a matter of judgement, based on whether they are fit for purpose.

First aid for travelling, remote and lone workers

What about employees who travel regularly or work elsewhere, what should be done about first-aid provision for them?

Employers are responsible for meeting the first-aid needs of their employees working away from the main site. The assessment of first-aid needs should determine whether:

  • those who travel long distances or are continuously mobile should carry a personal first-aid box; and
  • employees should be issued with personal communicators/mobile phones.

First-aiders

How many first-aiders are needed?

The findings of an employer's first-aid needs assessment will help them decide how many first-aiders are required. There are no hard and fast rules on exact numbers and all the relevant circumstances of your particular workplace should be taken into account. The table in the leaflet First aid at work assessment tool provides further guidance.

Can legal action be taken against first-aiders?

It is very unlikely that any action would be taken against a first-aider who was using the first-aid training they have received. HSE cannot give any specific advice on this issue as it does not fall within HSE's statutory powers.

It is recommended that you seek legal advice, or advice from your employer's insurance brokers on whether their policies cover first-aiders' liability.

Infection

When dealing with a casualty, how can the risk of cross-infection be minimised?

Training courses for first-aiders in the workplace highlight the importance of preventing cross-infection in first-aid procedures.

Particular concerns have been raised about the possibility of first-aiders becoming infected by a blood-borne virus (including HIV, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus) while performing first aid. HSE's free leaflet, Blood-borne viruses in the workplace, addresses this issue and advises on steps that can be taken to reduce the risk of infection.

Record keeping

Do incidents requiring the attention of a first-aider need to be recorded?

It is good practice for employers to provide first-aiders and appointed persons with a book in which to record incidents they attend. The information can help employers identify accident trends and possible areas for improvement in the control of health and safety risks. It can be used for reference in future first-aid needs assessments. The record book is not the same as the statutory accident book though the two might be combined.

Employers, self-employed people and those in control of premises have a duty to report some accidents and incidents at work under the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR).

What information should be recorded?

Useful information to record includes:

  • the date, time and place of the incident;
  • the name and job of the injured or ill person;
  • details of the injury/illness and what first aid was given;
  • details about what happened to the person immediately afterwards (eg went back to work, went home, went to hospital); and
  • the name and signature of the first-aider or person dealing with the incident.

Who is responsible for keeping the records?

It is usually the first-aider or appointed person who looks after the book. However, employers have overall responsibility.

Tablets and medication

Are first-aiders allowed to give tablets and medication to casualties?

First aid at work does not include giving tablets or medicines to treat illness. The only exception to this is where aspirin is used when giving first aid to a casualty with a suspected heart attack in accordance with currently accepted first-aid practice. It is recommended that tablets and medicines should not be kept in the first-aid box.

Some workers carry their own medication that has been prescribed by their doctor (eg an inhaler for asthma). If an individual needs to take their own prescribed medication, the first-aider's role is generally limited to helping them to do so and contacting the emergency services as appropriate.

Medicines legislation restricts the administration of injectable medicines. Unless self- administered, they may only be administered by or in accordance with the instructions of a doctor (eg by a nurse). However, in the case of adrenaline there is an exemption to this restriction, which means in an emergency a layperson is permitted to administer it by injection for the purpose of saving life. The use of an Epipen to treat anaphylactic shock falls into this category. Therefore, first-aiders may administer an Epipen if they are dealing with a life-threatening emergency involving a casualty who has been prescribed and is in possession of an Epipen, and where the first-aider is trained to use it.

The use of tablets and medication in the context of first-aid provision in the offshore industry is dealt with separately (see sections on offshore work under 'Training').

Training organisations

Appointed persons

What is an appointed person?

When an employer's first-aid needs assessment identifies that a first-aider is not necessary, the minimum requirement is to appoint a person to take charge of first-aid arrangements. The role of this appointed person includes looking after the first-aid equipment and facilities and calling the emergency services when required. They can also provide emergency cover, within their role and competence, where a first-aider is absent due to unforeseen circumstances (annual leave does not count).

Do appointed persons need to undertake first-aid training?

To fulfil their role, appointed persons do not need first-aid training. However, emergency first-aid training courses are available.

Can appointed persons perform first aid, eg cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR)?

Appointed persons are not first-aiders and should not attempt to give first aid for which they have not been trained.

Automated external defibrillators

What training is required for using a defibrillator?

First aid at work (FAW) courses do not cover the use of defibrillators. If you decide to provide a defibrillator in your workplace, it is important that those who may use it are appropriately trained. HSE does not specify the content of this training. However, whoever you select to deliver this training must be competent. Information on training is available from the Resuscitation Council (UK).

Infection

When dealing with a casualty, how can the risk of cross-infection be minimised?

Training courses for first-aiders in the workplace highlight the importance of preventing cross-infection in first-aid procedures.

Particular concerns have been raised about the possibility of first-aiders becoming infected by a blood-borne virus (including HIV, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus) while performing first aid. HSE's free leaflet, Blood-borne viruses in the workplace , addresses this issue and advises on steps that can be taken to reduce the risk of infection.

Tablets and medication

Are first-aiders allowed to give tablets and medication to casualties?

First aid at work does not include giving tablets or medicines to treat illness. The only exception to this is where aspirin is used when giving first aid to a casualty with a suspected heart attack in accordance with currently accepted first-aid practice. It is recommended that tablets and medicines should not be kept in the first-aid box.

Some workers carry their own medication that has been prescribed by their doctor (eg an inhaler for asthma). If an individual needs to take their own prescribed medication, the first-aider's role is generally limited to helping them to do so and contacting the emergency services as appropriate.

Medicines legislation restricts the administration of injectable medicines. Unless self administered, they may only be administered by or in accordance with the instructions of a doctor (eg by a nurse). However, in the case of adrenaline there is an exemption to this restriction, which means in an emergency a layperson is permitted to administer it by injection for the purpose of saving life. The use of an Epipen to treat anaphylactic shock falls into this category. Therefore, first-aiders may administer an Epipen if they are dealing with a life-threatening emergency involving a casualty who has been prescribed and is in possession of an Epipen, and where the first-aider is trained to use it.

The use of tablets and medication in the context of first-aid provision in the offshore industry is dealt with separately (see sections on offshore work under ‘Training’).

Frequently asked questions on first aid training and approval arrangements

First aid provision by employers

What are the penalties for not meeting FAW regulations?

Breaches of the Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981 are dealt with proportionately. Enforcement action could include issuing notices or prosecuting if the circumstances warrant it.

Is annual refresher training a mandatory requirement?

No. It is strongly recommended to employers to help qualified first aiders maintain their basic skills and keep up to date with any changes in first aid procedures.

Training

Maintenance of training quality?

Whilst HSE is confident that the existing first aid at work training (i.e. emergency first aid at work (EFAW) and first aid at work (FAW) meet the needs of the majority of businesses and remain the building blocks in the provision of first aid at work training, employers have the flexibility to choose whatever level of firat aid training is appropriate for their business need and circumstances.

Where can I find syllabuses for the three-day FAW and one-day EFAW courses?

The syllabuses can be found in guidance available on our website at First aid training and qualifications for the purposes of the Health and Safety (First-Aid) Regulations 1981.

Can I run an FAW course over four days?

Yes. The training should be conducted over a minimum of three days and maximum of ten weeks.

Does the EFAW course replace appointed person training?

For regulatory purposes, successfully completing an EFAW course will enable the student to act as a first-aider in the workplace. The role of the appointed person remains and there continues to be no regulatory requirement for such personnel to undertake first aid training. However, employers can still send appointed persons on basic first aid training such as on EFAW courses, in which case they would become first-aiders in regulatory terms.

2014-01-15