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Section 2 - Site layout and internal traffic routes

Check that the layout of routes is appropriate

Are the roads and footways suitable for the types and volumes of vehicular traffic and pedestrian traffic using them?
Are vehicles and pedestrians kept safely apart?

Where necessary are there suitable pedestrian crossing places on vehicle routes?

Is there a safe pedestrian route that allows visiting drivers to report for instructions when entering the site?

It may be useful to provide a plan of the workplace at the entrance (and at other appropriate points) showing vehicle routes, one-way systems and so on.  This would be particularly useful at workplaces that have visiting drivers.

Are there adequate numbers of suitable parking places for all vehicles and are they used?

Parking areas

Wherever practical, you should provide parking areas for all vehicles using the workplace – that is, for work-related vehicles and for private cars, motorcycles and pedal cycles.

Is there a properly designed and signed one-way system used on vehicle routes within the workplace where this can be achieved?

By law, every workplace must be organised so that pedestrians and vehicles can circulate safely.

One way systems are a form of traffic management used to control traffic around a site.  They are designed to limit reversing and prevent conflicting movements caused by ‘two way’ flow.  They are particularly useful where site access roads are narrow and visibility is poor

Is the level of lighting in each area sufficient for the pedestrian and vehicle activity?

Check that vehicle traffic routes are suitable for the type and quantity of vehicles, which use them

Are they wide enough?

Access:  Roads should be wide enough for the vehicles using them: 2 x width on single-track roads and 3.5 x width on double-track roads.  They must not be at a steeper slope than 1:10.  This includes access on stockpiles.

Do they have firm and even surfaces?

By law, every traffic route in a workplace must be built so that the driving surface is suitable for its purpose.  Also, the law requires that the surface of any traffic route must not be so uneven, potholed, sloped or slippery that any person is exposed to a risk to their health or safety.

Places where vehicles and their trailers park up for any reason should be ‘hardstanding’.   They should be made of a suitable material, and should be constructed soundly enough to safely bear the loads that will pass over them.

Regularly inspect outdoor surfaces and encourage employees to report poor condition. Make sure that potholes and uneven ground are filled in. Put barriers around until the area has been made safe.

All roads should be adequately surfaced and drained to ensure vehicles can be used safely.

Are they free from obstructions and other hazards?
Are they well maintained?
Do vehicle routes avoid sharp or blind bends?

There should be enough visibility at junctions and bends to allow drivers and pedestrians to see anything that might be dangerous.

Avoid sharp or blind bends on vehicles routes wherever possible.  Where you cannot avoid them, you should consider measures such as mirrors, stop signs or signals to help drivers and pedestrians see what is around the corner.

Check that suitable safety features are provided where appropriate

Are roadways marked where necessary, e.g. to indicate the right of way at road junctions?

Are road signs, as used in the Highway code, installed where necessary?
Are features such as fixed mirrors (to provide greater vision at blind bends), road humps (to reduce vehicle speeds), or barriers (to keep vehicles and pedestrians apart) provided where necessary?

Mirrors:

There should be enough visibility at junctions and bends to allow drivers and pedestrians to see anything that might be dangerous.

Avoid sharp or blind bends on vehicle routes wherever possible.  Where you cannot avoid them, you should consider measures such as mirrors to help drivers and pedestrians see what is around the corner.

When visibility at a bend or junction cannot be improved, stop signs or signals may be appropriate.  It may be necessary to prevent people from using the junction or bend altogether by enforcing a one-way system, or even blocking the road.

Limiting the speed that vehicles move around the workplace is a very important part of controlling traffic.

Using fixed features, for example: humps, narrowed routes (by bollards, raised kerbs, chicanes, built-in routeside features and so on – these are sometimes known as ‘pinch points’), and ‘rumble’ devices (such as rumble strips, rumble areas or jiggle bars).

Humps should be repeated at intervals along a route and should not be used where FLTs operate or within 15 m of a junction or bend.

Speed limit signs may need to be repeated around the site roads instead of just one sign being put up at the entrance to a limit area.

The humps themselves should also be clearly marked.

Sometimes speed cushions can be used instead of speed humps.  Speed cushions work in a similar way as speed humps, but do not stretch across the whole road.  Instead, they leave some space clear for certain types of vehicle to drive through or straddle the raised areas (for example, cyclists or larger emergency vehicles).  See Figure 13.

Barriers:

Protective barriers to keep vehicles away from pedestrian areas.

Where needed, you should provide suitable barriers or guard rails at the entrances and exits to buildings; at the corners of buildings; and to prevent pedestrians from walking straight onto roads.

Protective barriers should be built to the standards set out in BS 7669-3: 1994 Vehicle restraint system.  You should read the British Standards= Code of Practice BS 6180: 1999 Barriers in and about buildings for more information.

Updated 2013-12-23