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Training and supervision

Poor supervision and inadequate training are two of the main causes of accidents. The law requires that all workers must receive adequate training, including refresher training. It also makes good business sense to make sure your employees are working efficiently and safely.

Training can be in-house, as long as you have competent staff to provide it. It can also be external or a combination of both. It must cover the type of machine and work the operator will be expected to do. This is important if the operator works on more than one machine.

Training and supervision

Poor supervision and inadequate training are two of the main causes of accidents. The law requires that all workers must receive adequate training and refresher training. It also makes good business sense to make sure your employees are working efficiently and safely. Hear an interview with a training provider, an employee and the HSE which explains why training is so important.

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Who should be trained?

The training and supervision needs for each operator will vary. You will need to assess their needs carefully and make sure that training is appropriate for their age and experience.

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When should training be given?

New starters are likely to have the greatest training needs. You also need to think about refresher training for trained, qualified and experienced operators at least every three to five years, sooner if a risk assessment identifies a particular training need. Operators can lose some skills if they don’t use them regularly.

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Who needs refresher training?

Refresher training is important:

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Training schemes

 All wood machining training schemes, including those as part of a joinery, furniture and wood programme, should include the following elements:

General skills

General health and safety skills include an awareness of the health and safety risks and how to control them by:

Machine-specific skills

Operators need practical instruction in the safe operation of the machine, including:

Familiarisation

Familiarisation involves on-the-job training under close supervision.

Demonstrating competence

After the training has taken place the operator’s competence should be assessed to see if the training has been successful. The assessor must be someone who knows the machining process, its risks and the safe working practices that should be used.

Operators can only be classed as competent when they can demonstrate that they use the required knowledge and safe working practice all the time.

Competence checklist

A competent worker should be able to demonstrate:

Keeping records

Once the operator has received the necessary training and has demonstrated their competence, it is good practice to authorise them in writing for the machines and operations that they can use.

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Training providers

There are several specialist training providers accredited to awarding bodies such as the City and Guilds Institute and PIABC (the Institute of Materials, Minerals and Mining’s approved awarding organisation).

See also training providers details in Useful links.

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Find out more

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The law

Updated 2013-02-08