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Forestry statistics

All injuries in Forestry* broken down by employment status as reported to all enforcing authorities under the Reporting of Injuries Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995 (RIDDOR 95) during 2002/03 - 2010/11p*

Forestry and logging SIC and Forestry Occupation
Employment status Severity Year Total
2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09 2009/10 2010/11p
Employee Fatal injuries 0 0 4 0 0 3 0 1 2 10
Non-Fatal Major Injuries 42 30 41 33 24 31 35 30 44 310
Over 3 day injuries  84 92 68 76 69 91 62 78 68 688
Total 126 122 113 109 93 125 97 109 114 1008
Self Employed Fatal injuries 1 3 0 0 1 1 0 0 1 7
Non-Fatal Major Injuries 5 12 9 7 6 6 7 6 13 71
Over 3 day injuries  5 3 6 7 3 3 5 4 5 41
Total 11 18 15 14 10 10 12 10 19 119
Member of the public Fatal injuries 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 1 2
Non fatal to MOPS 12 7 12 13 24 35 25 4 8 140
Total 12 7 12 13 24 36 25 4 9 142
Total Fatal injuries 1 3 4 0 1 5 0 1 4 19
Non-Fatal Major Injuries 47 42 50 40 30 37 42 36 57 381
Over 3 day injuries  89 95 74 83 72 94 67 82 73 729
Non fatal to MOPS 12 7 12 13 24 35 25 4 8 140
Total 149 147 140 136 127 171 134 123 142 1269

Small numbers

This output includes counts that are relatively small numbers. (Further information that explains the need for caution when making comparisons that involve small numbers)

A further factor that needs consideration when numbers are small is that the coding of data is by its nature an error-prone process. Miscoding is more likely to occur as the coding becomes more detailed. Thus, for example, when the industrial sector (SIC) or nature of employment (SOC) is coded to a four digit level coding errors may have an important bearing. 

General caveats on RIDDOR data

RIDDOR data needs to be interpreted with care because it is known that non-fatal injuries are substantially under-reported. Currently, it is estimated that just over half of all such injuries to employees are actually reported, with the self-employed reporting a much smaller proportion. (Further information on the caveats that should be applied to analysis of RIDDOR data)

  1. Counts of non-fatal injuries reported under RIDDOR will almost always underestimate by a considerable amount the total that would have been recorded if there had been 100% reporting.
  2. Any comparisons between different subsets within RIDDOR data (e.g. comparisons between one industrial sector and another) need to take account of the possibility of there being markedly different reporting levels in the subsets being compared. 

Members of the Public (MOPs)

'The criteria for the reportability of accidents to members of the public are complex leading to uncertainty as to whether some cases are reportable. This leads to variability the data'. 

'The recording systems for reports of non-fatal accidents in sectors enforced by Local Authorities were modified in 08/09. This has resulted in a discontinuity in the time series for these data. Thus the apparent rise in the number of accidents in 08/09 and 09/10 is likely to be an artefact of these changes in the recording systems.'

2015-11-19