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Breakdowns of LFS Work-related Road Traffic Accidents in Great Britain

Table 1: Estimated annual incidence and percentage of self-reported, work-related non-fatal road traffic accidents to workers, by time taken to return to work, for people working in the last 12 months, averaged 2003/04-2011/12.

Time Taken to Return to Work Averaged estimated Incidence (thousands) Averaged estimated percentage of injuries
central 95% C.I. central 95% C.I.
lower upper lower upper
Same day 19 17 22 24% 22% 27%
1 day 10 9 12 13% 11% 15%
2 days 5 4 6 6% 5% 8%
3 days 6 5 7 7% 6% 9%
4 days 3 2 4 4% 3% 5%
5 to 7 days 8 7 10 10% 9% 12%
8 to 14 days 9 7 10 11% 9% 12%
15 to 30 days 7 6 9 9% 7% 11%
31 to 60 days 4 3 5 5% 4% 7%
61 to 365 days 4 3 5 4% 3% 6%
Still off / Don't know 5 4 6 6% 5% 7%
All road traffic injuries 81 76 86 .. .. ..

Source: Labour Force Survey (LFS)

Table 2: Estimated annual incidence and percentage of self-reported, work-related non-fatal road traffic accidents to workers, by nature of injury, for people working in the last 12 months, averaged 2006/07-2011/12.

Nature of injury Averaged estimated Incidence (thousands) Averaged estimated percentage of injuries
central 95% C.I. central 95% C.I.
lower upper lower upper
Fracture/broken bones 5 3 6 6% 5% 8%
Dislocation of joints * * * * * *
Strain/sprain 31 27 35 41% 37% 44%
Superficial 12 10 14 16% 13% 18%
Lacerations/open wounds * * * * * *
Burns/scalds * * * * * *
Other type of injury 25 22 29 33% 29% 36%
All road traffic injuries 77 71 83 .. .. ..

Source: Labour Force Survey (LFS)

Notes

.. Not applicable

* Sample numbers too small to provide reliable estimates.

† 1 day = The day after the accident,
2 days = On the second day after the accident etc

These statistics contain estimates of work-related road traffic accidents and are not comparable with DfT statistics

The Labour Force Survey (LFS) is a national survey currently consisting of around 44,000 households each quarter which provides information on the UK labour market. The Heath and Safety Executive commissions annual questions in the LFS to gain a view of work-related illness and workplace injury based on individuals' perceptions.

The LFS survey data is used to make inferences about the whole population. When data obtained from a sample is used in this way, there is an element of sampling error, or uncertainty, about the sample estimate. Confidence intervals represent the range of uncertainty resulting from the estimate being derived from a sample of people, not the entire population. They are calculated in such a way that the range has a 95% chance of including the true value in the absence of bias - that is the value that would have been obtained if the entire population had been surveyed.

Updated 2014-10-27