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Revision log

Revisions to published National Statistics since July 2010

Fatal RIDDOR injuries

October 2015

Please see the first revision entry for non-fatal RIDDOR injuries below

October 2013

Extent of Revision

  1. The final 'worker' figure for 2011/12 is revised from 172 to 171. This reduction relates to manufacturing, which reduced from 31 to 30 (Table 3).
  2. The regional breakdowns in Table 5 required two corrections to the 'rates'. (i) 'East' for 2011/12 has been revised from 0.9 to 0.70; and (ii) the five-year average 'Scotland' rate has been revised from 0.8 (rounded from 0.84) to 0.86.
  3. An update of some contextual and technical commentary.

Reason for Revision

These changes occurred after the initial release of Fatal Injury Statistics 2012/13 in July 2013.

  1. There was an error in the source data, with one record being duplicated.
  2. (i) This was a typing error. (ii) An error was found in the calculation of the rounded figure. To improve the comparability of these figures in Table 5, they are now shown to 2 'significant figures' not 1.
  3. Following a recent formal assessment by the UK Statistics Authority, the document was partially re-written to enhance readability and navigation for users. The opportunity was taken to re-write some sections whilst incorporating the above data errors.

October 2012

Extent of Revision

The industry breakdowns for fatal injury statistics for agriculture and services in 2010/11 have been revised. For agriculture there was an upward revision, from 30 to 34 worker deaths. There was a corresponding decrease in services, from 53 to 49.

Reason for Revision

Changes were made to the industry sector assigned to these incidents. These changes occurred after the initial release of fatal injury statistics in July 2012.

November 2011

Extent of Revision

Fatal injury rates have been revised following their initial release in June 2011 The largest effect is in the Agriculture industry, where the rate for 2010/11 has changed from 8.0 to 9.9 per 100 000 workers.

Reason for Revision

As of November 2011, the employment data source used by HSE's Statistics Branch is changing to the Annual Population Survey (APS). For further information on the previous sources used, and the reasons for changing to the APS, please read the employment section on the data sources page.

September 2011

Extent of Revision

The regional breakdown of fatal injury statistics for 2009/10 and 2010/11 was revised. The largest effect was for London in 2010/11 where the figure was revised from 11 to 17.

Reason for Revision

An error was made in the allocation of fatalities to regions. Allocation should be made based on the location of the incident where the fatality occurred. Instead the location had been defined based on the location of the deceased person's normal workplace.

October 2010

Extent of Revision

The number of fatal injuries to workers was revised from 178 to 179 for 2008/09 and from 151 to 152 for 2009/10p

Reason for Revision

Incorrect recording of a small number of fatal incidents on HSE's operational database resulted in them being initially excluded from the National Statistics count first published in June 2010.

Non-fatal RIDDOR injuries

October 2015

Context and extent of revisions

There have been two revisions to previously-published statistics.

For the first revision. The 2004/05 -2013/14 RIDDOR injury ‘rates’ only (i.e. excluding actual numbers of injuries) have been revised. Note, this change is separate to and excludes the regular yearly changes, namely where the previous ‘provisional’ year is rolled-over to a ‘final/revised’ year to account for late reports.

RIDDOR injury rates are primarily produced in relation to employees. Given the relatively small number of reports from the self-employed, in some circumstances rates are still produced but in less detail and coverage. However where rates for the self-employed are provided, these too have been revised for the same period and the same reason. Likewise the ‘worker’ injury rates have been revised, which comprises employees and the self-employed combined.

For the period 2004/05-2013/14, revised employment estimates have generally increased, meaning the revised injury rates have decreased (as the number of actual injuries has remained unchanged). During the period of revision the change has been small, with reductions in the overall all-industry rates of between 0.5 and 1.0%.

At a more detailed industry level, the changes are subject to slightly more fluctuation, although again almost all industries have seen slight increases in employment (and therefore decreases in revised injury rates). Decreases in employee rates for main industries are in the range 0.1% to 1.3% since 2006/07, and slightly larger increase in some industry rates (range 0 to 3%) for the earlier years 2004/05 and 2005/06.

For the second revision. This specifically relates to the single year 2011/12, and for the two ‘main industries’ of Mining and Quarrying (SIC ‘B’); and Electricity and Gas Supply (SIC ‘D’). The change only affects statistical tables (numbers and rates), where ‘main industry’ is used but no lower-level industry is present, The actual data tables affected are: ‘histinj’; histrate’; and ‘ridlkinds 1 to 3’.

For this single year 2011/12 the numbers, and corresponding rates of injuries, have reduced for Mining and Quarrying; and increased for Electricity and Gas Supply. The changes to the number of injuries to employees are 118 major and 290 over-3-day. The all-industry numbers have not changed, they have just moved from one main industry to another.

Reasons for Revision

For the first revision. Employment estimates use the Annual Population Survey (APS) data series, as provided by the Office for National Statistics (ONS), see the employment section on the data sources page.

The data series has been re-weighted by ONS back to 2004, to reflect new population estimates based on the 2011 Census.

For the second revision. This corrects an error in data presentation. HSE previously used to publish injury data for ‘Electricity and Gas Supply (SIC ‘D’)’ alongside ‘Mining and Quarrying (SIC ‘B’)’ as a combined figure and description (SIC B,D). The descriptors were changed but the data for that year was not, such that SIC D data is now sited with Waste and Recycling (SIC E) to give SIC D,E.

October 2013

Extent of Revision

The 2009/10 and 2010/11 RIDDOR rates and estimated RIDDOR reporting levels have been revised to take account of revisions to the employment data.

The effects on the employment rates:

  • For 2009/10, the revised rates overall are about 0.1% higher using the updated data. Within this overall figure, the change in rates at a more detailed level of industry, occupation and region is larger, namely in the range +/- 2.5%
  • For 2010/11, the revised rates overall have changed a negligible amount. Within this overall figure, the change in rates at a more detailed level of industry, occupation and region is in the range +/- 1%

The revised employment data (denominator for RIDDOR rates), has had no impact on the published overall estimates of RIDDOR reporting levels of non-fatal injuries (major and over-3-days' incapacitation injuries) by employment status. However, reporting levels by main industry have increased or decreased by one or two percentage points with the exception of public administration and defence where the reporting level of non-fatal injuries to employees increased from 66% to 69% and to workers (employees and self-employed) from 65% to 69%

Reason for Revision

The Office for National Statistics has re-weighted the 2009 and 2010 Annual Population Survey (APS) data using revised population estimates. Employment estimates from the APS are used in the calculation of RIDDOR rates.

October 2012

Extent of Revision

The injury and ill health rates for all RIDDOR rate tables have been revised to 2004/5.

Reason for Revision

The Office for National Statistics has re-weighted the Annual Population Survey data back to 2004. For further information on this change please read the employment section on the data sources page.

November 2011

Extent of Revision

The injury and ill health rates for all RIDDOR rate tables have been revised to 2004/5.

Reason for Revision

As of November 2011, the employment data source used by HSE's Statistics Branch is changing to the Annual Population Survey (APS). For further information on the previous sources used, and the reasons for changing to the APS, please read the employment section on the data sources page

October 2010

Extent of Revision

Injury rates from 2001/02 to 2008/09 have been revised. This affects both total rates and those by industry.

The table below shows the effects of the revisions on previously used employee totals for the broad industrial sectors and overall. Overall there is little difference in the totals. There are some larger upward revisions for agriculture from 2002/3 to 2007/8, ranging from 7% to 17%. The changes for other sectors are less, the main ones being Construction (-6% in 2002/3) and Extractive (6% in 2006/7). The effect on the worker denominators will be smaller in magnitude because the self-employed component has not been subject to revision.

% change in the employee denominator used to calculate rates for RIDDOR data
  2001/02 2002/03 2003/04 2004/05 2005/06 2006/07 2007/08 2008/09
Agriculture -0.2% 7.5% 13.7% 13.5% 17.5% 15.7% 7.3% 3.3%
Extractive 0.9% -1.3% -0.1% 0.0% 1.3% 5.8% 2.9% -1.4%
Manufacturing -1.1% -1.2% -1.2% -1.5% -1.0% -0.3% -0.8% -2.7%
Construction 1.5% -1.2% -6.3% 1.3% 0.7% 0.6% -1.5% -4.1%
Service 0.8% 0.8% 0.7% 0.0% -0.3% 0.4% 0.5% 1.3%
All industries 0.0% 0.0% -0.2% -0.4% -0.1% 0.5% 0.3% 0.6%

Reason for Revision

In July 2010, the ONS revised the employee job series which forms the denominator for all RIDDOR injury rates for employees and workers. Visit the ONS website for more details about the reason and scale of the revisions.

Labour Force Survey (LFS)

October 2015

Extent of Revision

The 2000/01 -2013/14 results have been revised. This affects estimates and rates.

The table below shows the range of revisions to the overall measures of work-related illness and workplace injuries. For example, the estimated prevalence of work-related illness in 2006/07 was revised from 1,384 thousand to 1,416 thousand, an increase of 2.3% and the estimated working days lost for workplace injury in 2013/14 was revised from 4,723 thousand to 4,447 thousand, a fall of 5.9%. The impact on the overall results is fairly small, but the percentage changes are more variable in direction and size when the data are disaggregated e.g. by industry, occupation or region.

Percentage change in the overall measures of work-related illness and workplace injury
Type of measure Range of percentage change from original published figures
Illness
Prevalence - all illness
Estimate -0.17% to 2.3%
Rate per 100,000 employed in last 12 months -0.42% to 0.26%
Incidence - all illness
Estimate 0% to 2.8%
Rate per 100,000 employed in last 12 months 0% to 0.61%
Working days lost
Estimate -3.7% to 0.39%
Days lost per worker -4.6% to 0.23%
Injury
Incidence - all non-fatal injury
Estimate -0.39% to 2.9%
Rate per 100,000 workers -0.44% to 0.27%
Working days lost - all injuries
Estimate -5.9% to 4.9%
Days lost per worker 6.0% to 4.3%

Reasons for Revision

  1. The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has reweighted the Labour Force Survey data sets back to mid-2001 to reflect new population estimates based on the 2011 Census.
  2. Implementing improvements in the days lost methodology (2000/01-2013/14), in particular the methods used to impute for missing days lost information.

November 2011

Extent of Revision

The 2001/02 -2009/10 results have been revised. This affects estimates and rates.

The table below shows the range of revisions to the 2001/02- 2009/10 overall measures of work-related illness and workplace injuries. The impact on the overall results is small, but greater percentage changes occur when broken down by demographic and employment related variables. For example the estimated prevalence of work-related illness in 2005/06 for Postal workers, mail sorters, messengers and couriers (SOC code 9211) was revised from 5500 to 5600, an increase of approximately 2% with the associated rate increasing from 2570 to 2600 per 100,000 an increase of approximately 1.3%.

Percentage change in the overall measures of work-related illness and workplace injury
Type of measure Range of percentage change from original published figures
Illness
Prevalence - all illness
Estimate -0.22% to 1.6%
Rate per 100,000 employed in last 12 months -0.36% to 0.01%
Incidence - all illness
Estimate -0.31% to 1.9%
Rate per 100,000 employed in last 12 months -0.42% to 1.31%
Working days lost
Estimate -0.42% to 1.3%
Days lost per worker -0.74% to 0.13%
Injury
Incidence - reportable non-fatal injury
Estimate -1.0% to 2.6%
Rate per 100,000 workers -0.87% to 0.69%
Working days lost - all injuries
Estimate -0.80% to 2.6%
Days lost per worker -0.65% to 0.49%

Reason for Revision

  1. The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has reweighted the Labour Force Survey data sets back to mid-2001 to reflect new population estimates based on the 2011 Census.
  2. Implementing improvements in the days lost methodology (2000/01-2013/14), in particular the methods used to impute for missing days lost information.

May 2011

Extent of Revision

The 2008/09 results have been revised. This affects four industry groups and has a very small impact on the full range of results.

Reason for Revision

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) revised a small number of 1992 Standard Industrial Classification (SIC 92) codes following the identification of a few errors in the mapping from the SIC 2007 to SIC 92. This had a small impact on the weighting factors developed by HSE (explanation of weighting LFS data).

THOR

October 2012

Extent of Revision

Ill health rates in the THOR industry and occupation tables, have been revised to 2004/5.

Reason for Revision

The Office for National Statistics has re-weighted the Annual Population Survey data back to 2004. For further information on this change please read the employment section on the data sources page.

November 2011

Extent of Revision

Ill health rates in the THOR industry and occupation tables, have been revised to 2004/5.

Reason for Revision

As of November 2011, the employment data source used by HSE's Statistics Branch is changing to the Annual Population Survey (APS). For further information on the previous sources used, and the reasons for changing to the APS, please read the employment section on the data sources page.

European Comparisons

October 2014

Extent of revision:

The UK average rate (2006-2010) of fatal injuries has been revised from 0.97 to 0.91 (Fatal injury statistics - Table 6).

Reason:

Fatality data provided by Eurostat for 2008 and 2010 seems inconsistent with previous year’s rates used by HSE. As a result, fatality rates for these two years have not been updated in the European Comparisons publication. This has subsequently affected the UK average (2006-2010) in the Fatal Injuries publication. Work is ongoing to clarify the changes made by Eurostat.

Extent of revision:

Data from the EU LFS (2007) on percentage of workers who had an accident resulting in sick leave (EU Comparisons Table 2) or ill health resulting in sick leave (EU Comparisons Table 3) has been revised by Eurostat for a number of countries. These revisions are of a small magnitude.

Reason for revision:

This data is sourced from the Eurostat website, and the reason for these revisions is being clarified by HSE.

Enforcement Prosecutions

November 2011

Extent of Revision

Scottish prosecution figures have been revised to exclude prosecutions that were not taken by the Crown Office and Procurator Fiscal Service (COPFS). To indicate the scale of the revision, the number of offences prosecuted in Scotland in 2009/10 has been revised from 100 to 51.

Reason for Revision

Scottish prosecutions are taken by the COPFS on the basis of HSE notes. Previously, prosecutions that were recommended by HSE but not taken by the COPFS were classed as not guilty, which affected the conviction rate for Scotland. The changes to the enforcement suite of tables now provide a more accurate reflection of the Scottish prosecution system.

July 2010

Extent of Revision

The number of cases prosecuted by HSE in 2008/09 was increased by 1.

Reason for Revision

An error was discovered in the source data where one prosecution case (with two breaches) had been incorrectly assigned to the Office for the Rail Regulator.

Enforcement Notices

November 2012

Extent of Revision

The number of enforcement notices issued by HSE in 2011/12 (provisional) was increased from 8 480 to 9 910.

Reason for Revision

An error was discovered with the source data. Notices recorded on HSE systems in Quarter 4 of 2011/12 were missing from the source data that was used to produce figures first published on 31 October 2012.

Asbestos Register

November 2011

Extent of Revision

The number of deaths from asbestosis as underlying cause was revised from 104 to 123 for 2006, 93 to124 for 2007 and 107 to 148 for 2008. The total number of death certificates mentioning asbestosis remained unaffected.

Reason for Revision

Miscoding of the underlying cause of death.

Costs

October 2015

Extent of revision

Revisions impact on 2006/07-2012/13 annual cost estimates for workplace injury and ill health (for 2011/12, only an injury cost estimate is available). Average annual increase of 1.7% in the overall cost of workplace injury and ill health: for ill health an average annual increase of 6.0%, for injury an annual average decrease of 5.1%. Looking in particular at 2012/13, cost of workplace injury and ill health increased slightly from £14.24 billion to £14.27 billion, cost of injury decreased from £5.64 billion to £5.12 billion and cost of ill health increased from £8.60 billion to £9.14 billion.

Reasons for revision

1. Revisions to the underlying injury and illness numbers from the Labour Force Survey due to (i) a major reweighting exercise of LFS data to reflect new population estimates produced from the 2011 Census;(ii) a new improved methodology for estimating working days lost due to work-related illness and injury from the LFS; and (iii) revised estimate of the number of workers who permanently leave the labour market each year due to a work-related illness or injury.

2. Cost estimates revised to express each years’ cost estimates in current year (2013) prices.

October 2014

Extent of Revision

  1. Revisions impact on 2006/07-2010/11 annual cost estimates for workplace injury and ill health and 2011/12 injury cost estimate (no ill health cost estimate available for 2011/12).  Average annual increase of 1.5% in the overall cost of workplace injury and ill health: for ill health an average annual increase of 3.4%, for injury an annual average decrease of 1.1%.  Looking in particular at 2010/11, cost of workplace injury and ill health increased from £13.8 billion to £14.0 billion, cost of injury decreased from £5.4 billion to £5.3 billion and cost of ill health increased from £8.4 billion to £8.7 billion.

Reason for Revision

  1. A small error in the model underestimated the time taken off work for injuries with up to 7 days off work.
  2. Ongoing methodological improvements to the cost model including: improved method for accounting for lost income for those cases resulting in withdrawal from the labour market; an improved estimate of the split of cases withdrawing from the labour market as a result of workplace injury or ill health between injury and ill health; revised costing categories for workplace non-fatal injury and ill health (both injury and ill health now estimate costs separately for cases with up to 6 days off work and 7 or more days off work).
  3. Cost estimates revised to express each years cost estimates in current year(2012) prices.

October 2013

Extent of Revision

  1. 3% increase in 2010/11 estimate (expressed in 2010 prices) from £13.4bn to £13.8bn, though the overall distribution of cost by the different cost components and cost bearers remains stable.
  2. The net effect was an annual downward revision of less than 0.5% to annual total cost estimate.

Reason for Revision

  1. An error was found in the source data for the 2010/11 estimate - the source data had not been updated with the time off work profile for illness and injury cases for 2010/11 and also, the prosecution costs were found to be based on 2011/12 data.
  2. Number of refinements to the methodology, including (i) linking future increases in benefits to the Consumer Prices Index (rather than the Retail Price Index, in line with Government policy); (ii) excluding costs arising from cases of occupational cancer from compensation and Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit (IIDB) costs; and (iii) changes in definition of non-fatal reportable and non-reportable injury in line with amendments to RIDDOR regulations. Also, in line with usual practice annual cost estimates revised to current year prices (2011).

October 2012

Extent of Revision

Expressing previous years cost estimates in 2010 prices had an upward effect on the cost estimates. However these were countered by other changes within the model, resulting in overall negligible impact to the cost estimates.

Reason for Revision

Cost estimates for 2006/07 to 2009/10 were revised to express costs in 2010 prices. Additionally (i), the estimate for the number of workers who permanently withdraw from the labour market as a result of their illness or injury was revised across the back series, and (ii) an improved method for accounting for Industrial Injuries Disablement Benefit was introduced.

Updated 2016-02-08