This website uses non-intrusive cookies to improve your user experience. You can visit our cookie privacy page for more information.

Noise in printing

Noise can be a problem in the printing industry. Specific guidance for Noise in Printing is being developed. This page identifies the problem, what you need to do and further information.

Short duration exposure to high noise levels can cause temporary hearing loss. Permanent hearing loss results from longer term exposures. Often, you don’t know your hearing is being damaged until some hearing loss has happened. Some effects of noise exposure are quicker, such as developing tinnitus. This can be a permanent ringing or whooshing sound that gets worse when it is quiet.
This demonstration shows what it’s like to suffer noise-induced hearing loss.

What you need to do

Control the risk of hearing damage by reducing noise exposure as low as possible if you cannot eliminate it. You must reduce daily noise exposure to at least 85 decibels (second action level) and preferably to 80 decibels (first action level) or less.

Assess noise exposure

Work out the likely noise exposure levels in your workplace for workers based on the range of jobs they do. The HSE noise calculators will help you work out the likely exposure levels.

Reduce noise/exposure

The best way of reducing noise in the workplace is to reduce noise at source. Plan to reduce by:

Provide hearing protection

If noise levels are still above the exposure levels after noise reduction provide hearing protection and make sure operators use it. Hearing protection should:

Use the calculator on HSE noise website to check if your hearing protection gives the right level of protection.

Buy cost effective hearing protection – employees may use several pairs per day of cheap, basic earplugs, so repeated use protection may be best. Consider hearing protection with additional benefits:

Health surveillance

Provide Health surveillance (hearing checks) for all employees regularly exposed above the upper exposure action values (daily or weekly exposure of 85dB or peak sound pressure of 135dB) or are at risk, for example already suffer from hearing loss.

Find out more

Updated: 2012-11-20