This website uses non-intrusive cookies to improve your user experience. You can visit our cookie privacy page for more information.

Social media

Javascript is required to use HSE website social media functionality.

Construction – Tower Crane Safety

What do I need to do to comply with the law in relation to tower crane safety?

There are four key aspects to the safe use of cranes.  These are planning lifting operations, safe systems of work, supervision of lifting and thorough examination.  For more information see: HSE cranes webpage.

Do tower cranes on construction sites have to be notified to HSE and registered?

The Notification of Conventional Tower Crane Regulations 2010 - the Regulations that set out the duty to notify the use of conventional tower cranes on construction sites to HSE, have been revoked, and the associated Register closed down with effect from 6 April 2013.  The proposal to revoke the Regulations arose from recommendations contained in the Löfstedt Report Reclaiming Health and Safety for All.  As of 6 April 2013, there is no longer a duty to notify tower cranes on construction sites to HSE.  Further information about the proposals to revoke the Regulations can be found in HSE Consultative Document CD239 and HSE Board Paper HSE/12/57.

Now the Tower Cranes Regulations have been revoked and the Register is closed, what is HSE doing in relation to tower crane safety?

HSE will continue its work with the construction industry as part of wider efforts to raise safety standards.  There is now a comprehensive suite of free guidance published by the Strategic Forum for Construction Plant Safety Group which represents those in the tower crane supply chain, including the UK Contractors Group.  Topics covered include the competence of those erecting and dismantling tower cranes; thorough examination, inspection and maintenance of tower cranes; and the management of the installation and dismantling process.  For details of the free guidance, go to CPA website

Additionally HSE is a member of the Construction Plant-hire Association Tower Crane Interest Group (TCIG) which represents the interests for almost all tower crane companies in the UK.  The group monitors and revises existing tower cranes guidance and develops and promotes any new practical standards should they be required.  HSE endorses a TCIG-led industry notification system of Technical Information Notes, which enable the industry to disseminate information on new or emerging issues.

HSE has a responsibility for regulating the safety of the design, manufacture and supply of machines.  HSE influences standards through membership of the various industry bodies, standards committees and, in the case of an emerging serious problem, can take action to stop supply of machines.

How can the public be reassured that tower cranes on construction sites are safe?

HSE is in discussion with the construction industry to seek alternative means of reassuring the public about the safety of tower cranes such as re-energising the Safe Crane Campaign and its associated poster developed by the Strategic Forum for Construction.  For more information about the Safe Crane Campaign and how to get copies of the poster go to the CPA Safe Crane Campaign guidance.

Before the Tower Crane Regulations were revoked, I notified tower cranes to HSE as a dutyholder. What will happen to this information and my personal details?

The data will be kept securely for seven years, after which it will be automatically deleted.

The information provided will be held and used in the same way as other information that HSE holds i.e. in accordance with rights of access governed by requirements such as those in the Data Protection Act and the Freedom of Information Act.  For further information please read HSE's privacy statement.

Can the public request information from the Tower Crane Register now that it is closed?

Yes. In the short term, it may be used to help to reassure anyone seeking information on the safety of particular cranes that were registered before the closure of the Register and that are still in use. Longer term, any information still held by HSE i.e. that which is less than seven years old, may be reasonably requested for any other reason by the public e.g. for research purposes.

The information provided will be held and used in the same way as other information that HSE holds i.e. in accordance with rights of access governed by requirements such as those in the Data Protection Act and the Freedom of Information Act. For further information please read HSE's privacy statement.

2013-04-05