This website uses non-intrusive cookies to improve your user experience. You can visit our cookie privacy page for more information.

Results of inspection initiatives in 2009 and 2007/08

2009

What did we do in March 2009?

What did we find?

Although encouraging signs of improvement were found on previous initiatives in 2007/08, HSE inspections again identified significant amounts of poor practice across Great Britain.

This time one in five sites, and one in five contractors, were considered to be working so far below the acceptable standard that HSE inspectors felt it necessary to use their powers to serve enforcement notices to immediately stop the work or activity on site (PN), or to require improvements to be made within a specified timescale (IN).

Working at height remains the biggest single cause of serious and fatal injuries on construction sites, yet despite this, on average, approximately one in six of the sites inspected demonstrated significant failings in this area requiring service of an immediate PN.

Falls and trips in construction – Results of inspection initiatives in 2007/08

What did we do in February 2008?

What did we do in Summer 2007?

What did we find?

HSE inspections identified significant amounts of poor practice across Great Britain.

Approximately one in three sites, and one in four contractors, were considered to be working so far below the acceptable standard that HSE inspectors felt it necessary to use their powers to serve enforcement notices to immediately stop the work or activity on site (PN), or to require improvements to be made within a specified timescale (IN).

Working at height is the biggest single cause of serious and fatal injuries on construction sites, yet despite this, on average, almost one in five of the sites inspected demonstrated significant failings in this area requiring service of an immediate PN.

Working safely at height is a matter of following simple precautions. The basic principles are:

Slips and trips, along with falls from height, are the biggest cause of major injuries in construction. Tripping hazards on site are not something which should be taken lightly as our inspectors proved, serving nearly 70 enforcement notices in relation to good order issues during both initiatives.

Good order on site makes good common sense and is good business practice. A tidy and organised site tends to be a more productive one, where people are able to spend their time doing the work they’ve been paid to do rather than clearing waste out of the way before they can start or climbing over mountains of rubbish to get to their place of work.

What can you do to manage risks on site?

Further sources of information to help you manage working at height and good order risks on site:

Updated 2011-11-04