This website uses non-intrusive cookies to improve your user experience. You can visit our cookie privacy page for more information.

Priority programmes

Introduction

2.1 The Government and the HSC have for the first time set national targets for improving health and safety performance over the next ten years. Delivery of the new targets will depend crucially on the commitment of stakeholders in the health and safety system: employers, workers, safety representatives, Government, local authorities, employers' associations and trade unions, professional bodies and safety charities, and many others. In the coming year we will be asking all stakeholders to share their own action plans in order to help meet these targets.

Targets

Our aim is for HSC and all stakeholders working together to:

2.2 We have selected eight priority programmes covering hazards or sectors where major improvements are necessary if the targets are to be met. In selecting these priorities we aim to tackle those hazards and industries where large numbers are employed, the incidence rate of injuries or ill health is high and where we have the levers to bring about change and success. We will focus on five hazard areas and three sectors. These are:

2.3 We will use a mix of the tools described in paragraph 1.26. These have been designed to suit the needs of each programme, based on the particular circumstances in each sector or hazard. However, a common strand throughout is the involvement of stakeholders to help deliver the targets.

2.4 For some hazards we need to gather further more robust data, develop relationships with stakeholders and formulate plans to help develop an effective programme. This will provide a platform for action to achieve the targets. In the stress programme we will carry out research and develop best practice guidance including management standards against which performance can be measured. In the musculoskeletal programme, where we have better information, we will commission research, develop guidance and carry out targeted enforcement campaigns.

2.5 In other hazards, where knowledge and understanding is better developed, different approaches can be adopted which focus for example on securing compliance with the law. However, with these too there continues to be a need to carry out research and provide guidance and advice where appropriate.

2.6 In the construction sector, we will tailor approaches to securing compliance with the law, improving knowledge and skills where necessary and developing support mechanisms to assist the wide range of stakeholders in this industry. In agriculture with its wide range of employment circumstances, few large employers and a large number of small firms, many of which are family run, we will place emphasis on education, publicity and awareness. In health services, which has the advantage of a single central body, the National Health Service (NHS), we will develop a strong collaborative approach. We will work with the NHS to support their quality improvement programmes for health and safety, and we will also carry out a programme to improve compliance with the law.

2.7 In the local authority enforced sector slips and trips are a particular hazard, especially for the public, we will work with local authorities through HELA to develop programmes which will bring down the levels of injury caused by such incidents.

2.8 These hazards and sectors are those where action is needed now. If such action is successful we will bring forward new priorities later. Health issues often require longer to identify the scope of problems and the best ways of tackling them before specific action can be taken. There is inevitably an overlap between work that is carried on in sectors and work to address specific hazards. Details of how each programme is being developed follows.

[back to top]

Falls from height

Interim targets

Selected milestones for 2001/02

Baselines

2.9 Falls from a height are one of the biggest causes of fatal and major injuries. All industrial sectors are affected. This priority programme will build on existing planned work. In particular we will be taking measures to secure strict compliance with the law targeting construction and maintenance in several key sectors, falls from chemical road tankers, falls from lorries in the mining industry, and falls from height in the offshore industry.

2.10 This priority programme will link with and complement other priority programmes on agriculture and construction where falls from height feature significantly in accident statistics (for example 50% of fatal falls from a height occur in construction). The agricultural priority programme aims to reduce fatalities and falls from height by 3% in 2002/03 and 5% in 2003/04.

2.11 Other activities will be built up through partnerships with stakeholders, and through research to improve knowledge, skills and support systems and to identify opportunities for early improvements.

2.12 This programme will have four key messages:

Programme of work

2.13 Below is a selection of the activities to be taken forward in this priority programme. Work will also be taken forward under HSE's construction and agriculture priority programmes.

2001/02

Activity Description
Compliance

We will carry out a Priority Inspection Programme of 960 visits to deliver a 5% reduction in the incidence rate of fatal and major incidents caused by falls from heights in all premises by 2004:

  • ensuring good practice in for example, proper planning and procurement of maintenance work;
  • working with intermediaries (especially in local authorities, and the construction and agricultural industry) to improve standards in erection and dismantling of scaffolding, targeting planning supervisors, principal contractors and, for example, standards in seasonal work at heights in agriculture;
  • using Construction (Design and Management) Regulation (CDM) principles to design out the need for work at heights; and
  • working with local authorities to target off-site workers such as window cleaners.

In the Chemicals industry our compliance programme will aim to:

  • achieve a 15% reduction in falls from chemical road tankers by the end of 2002/3 through ensuring all clients visited have in place suitable and sufficient risk assessments and management control measures to prevent falls from chemical road tankers; and
  • achieve a 5 year target to ensure 25% of clients visited in 2000/01 have eliminated the need for routine high level access to road tankers.

In the Offshore chemical industry our compliance programme aims to secure a 15% reduction in falls from height by the end of three years through:

  • investigation of reportable incidents;
  • inspections of the control of high risk activities offshore; and
  • general awareness raising of the risks of working at height offshore.
Continuous improvement

We will build partnerships to develop and deliver a long term strategy to reduce falls from height through:

  • establishing links with key stakeholders; identifying how they can contribute to RHS targets; and
  • engaging offshore stakeholders through industry contacts, trade associations, safety representatives, the Offshore Industry Advisory Committee (OIAC) and technical fora eg conferences, and workshops.
Knowledge

We will improve our knowledge and understanding of the causes of falls from a height through:

  • research into accident causation to identify opportunities for early outcomes;
  • research to design out the need for work at heights as far as possible;
  • mapping key stakeholders and the work they have in hand to reduce falls from height, and also to identify key target groups; and
  • mapping existing knowledge (on, for example, available training and take up) and existing guidance.
Skills

We will improve skills and competence through:

  • ensuring employers provide workers with necessary competence for working at heights, especially in construction and maintenance activities.
Support

We will ensure consumers have the right advice on equipment purchasing through:

  • working with Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) on consumer safety to encourage proper selection and safe use of ladders and other access equipment.

2002/03 and 2003/04

2.14 In addition to reviewing and evaluating progress made during the first year of this priority programme, we will work in the following areas.

Activity Description
Compliance

We will continue the Priority Inspection Programme through:

  • targeted visits and blitzes; and
  • implementing the Temporary Work at Heights directive due to be completed in 2004/5.
Continuous improvement

We will build on partnerships developed during year one and put in place actions agreed in strategy for year one including:

  • action programmes to address causes of falls from height where identified; and
  • review and evaluation of action required to meet any gaps.
Knowledge

We will continue research programmes from year one.

Skills

We will continue activity from year one and Introduce any actions necessary to meet gaps identified by research on available training.

[back to top]

Workplace transport

Interim targets

Selected milestones for 2001/02

Baselines

The number of incidents and injuries is affected by the amount of work activity going on involving workplace transport and this can vary. HSE is working to develop baselines against which we can measure the success of this programme.

Programmes of work

2.15 Workplace transport incidents are usually caused by a complex combination of factors. For example, management and procedural factors together account for 80% of the incidents caused. Intermediate priorities are to target these areas, in particular looking at training, through discussion with accrediting bodies. Surrogate targets will be developed for this work.

2.16 We are committed to the involvement of stakeholders in the development of this work. HSE inspectorate and local authority enforcement officers will take forward enforcement activity to ensure compliance with the law over the three years of this Plan. Activities to improve knowledge, skills and support systems and to encourage continuous improvement will follow stakeholder consultation and discussion.

2001/02

Activity Description
Compliance

We will carry out a Priority inspection Programme including:

  • 1700 visits by inspectors to premises in all sectors with particular attention being paid to workplace transport in the construction, agricultural, quarries, docks and airport sectors. These visits will deal with:
    • separation of vehicles and pedestrians,
    • minimisation of reversing, and
    • improving the rearward visibility of high risk vehicles.
  • co-operative working with the road haulage industry to improve compliance.

Local authority enforcement activity will focus on the segregation of vehicles and pedestrians; and the management of reversing movements.

Continuous improvement

We are committed to the involvement of stakeholders, we will:

  • set up a stakeholder action group, involving SMEs especially, to take views and seek volunteers for smaller subgroups to deal with discrete projects to reduce workplace transport risks;
  • prepare and issue a discussion document; and analyse responses; and
  • develop a HSE workplace transport web page to facilitate greater openness.
Knowledge

We will fund a research programme to:

  • identify the causative factors of workplace transport incidents and identify baselines;
  • survey employer awareness of workplace transport risks; and
  • identify SME stakeholders through accrediting bodies (for lift trucks), equivalent organisations, and through local authorities.
Support

We will develop guidance on reducing falls from vehicles.

2002/03 and 2003/04

2.17 The work to be undertaken in years two and three of this priority programme will be based on the evaluation of stakeholder discussions, the response to the discussion document on workplace transport and research into workplace transport accident occurrences. A detailed plan of activity for these years will be developed and published when that evaluation is complete. HSE operational and local authority activity on workplace transport safety will continue into year's two and three of the plan eg by enforcement of the use of Closed Circuit Television (CCTV) in appropriate situations.

[back to top]

Musculoskeletal disorders

Interim targets

Selected milestones for 2001/02

Baselines

Programmes of work

2.18 Current programmes are already contributing to general improvements in awareness and injury/absence rates. To achieve progress of the order envisaged in the targets, we need new and innovative initiatives involving all stakeholders. These will especially need to address upper limb disorders, including repetitive strain injuries, as we already have in place programmes for back pain. Below are details of some of the main programmes of work.

2001/02

Activity Description
Compliance

To improve compliance with the law we will:

  • carry out a programme of 3290 targeted visits to reduce manual handling injuries;
  • review slips and trips injury reports to identify high risk industries where these result in WRMSD and target poor performers;
  • develop manual handling risk assessment tools to help duty holders comply;
  • implement a manual handling campaign at chemical manufacturing premises to determine the impact of employer's involvement and to promote the 'Handle With Care' open learning pack and check the suitability of risk assessments;
  • within the mining industry, we will investigate selected back pain absence reports and conduct audit inspections targeted at control systems and their effectiveness; and
  • target manual handling activities offshore through inspections and interventions.
Continuous Improvement

To promote good practice we will:

  • identify good manual handling practices in the health sector and also innovative solutions in the woodworking industry;
  • develop a pilot ergonomic interventions programme, particularly aimed at tackling work related upper limb disorders (WRULDs), in partnership with CBI/TUC/IoD, to set targets for individual sectors;
  • work with insurance companies to target industries and activities with high compensation cases associated with WRMSD, and in particular WRULDs;
  • promote a holistic approach to better management of acute WRMSDs; and
  • use Offshore WRMSD case studies to spread best practice.
Knowledge

To improve our knowledge on WRMSDs we will commission research to:

  • review manual handling problems and identify solutions for known high risk sectors and activities;
  • review the evidence of injury from lifting heavy building blocks;
  • identify the WRMSD risk factors in selected construction trades and occupations; and
  • determine risk factors in handling in hot and cold environments.
Skills

To improve skills and competence we will:

  • deliver new training for inspectors on the manual handling of patients in health care.
Support

To ensure employers and employees have the right information and advice to manage WRMSD we will:

  • publish revised guidance on the prevention of WRULDs in the workplace;
  • publish and widely promote manual handling guidance for home care workers;
  • publish revised guidance on the Display Screen Equipment Regulations (DSER); and
  • develop a programme of support particularly for small firms linking into the Occupational Health Advisory Committee's (OHAC) recommendations on improving access to occupational health support.

2002/03

Activity Description
Compliance

To improve compliance with the law we will:

  • carry out enforcement campaigns on activities and sectors with known high risk activities; and
  • operate and monitor a NHS based pilot programme on manual handling.
Continuous improvement

To promote best practice we will:

  • work with intermediaries to improve information to construction project designers on manual handling risks;
  • liaise with manufacturers and suppliers of concrete building products to reduce manual handling risks;
  • agree, with stakeholders, standards for manual handling in the parcel handling industry;
  • introduce a further initiative to promote the holistic approach to better management of acute WRULD and Lower Back Pain (LBP);
  • operate and monitor ergonomic intervention pilots; and
  • motivate poor performers to improve through seminars and enforcement campaigns.
Knowledge

We will commission research to:

  • evaluate manual handling incidents in woodworking; and
  • evaluate construction design methods.
Skills

To improve skills and competence we will:

  • Develop further guidance and training for inspectors on good practice in patient handling; and
  • identify training needs of health professionals in the management of WRMSD, and particularly WRULDs.
Support

To ensure that the right support is in place we will:

  • develop guidance on WRMSD based on research into the risk factors in construction trades and associations;
  • operate and monitor the programme of support on manual handling (linked to the OHAC recommendations) with pilots to include WRMSD support; and
  • develop further guidance on manual handling for remaining sectors and activities where there are high risk.

2003/04

Activity Description
Compliance

To improve compliance with the law we will:

  • continue enforcement campaigns in key risk sectors and extend to include parcel handling operations; and
  • complete and evaluate the NHS based pilot programme on manual handling and develop guidance as basis for an enforcement campaign.
Continuous improvement

To achieve continuous improvement we will:

  • continue and build on the programmes developed in 2001/02 and 2002/03; and
  • evaluate the campaign to promote an holistic approach to better management of acute WRULD and LBP injuries and consider expanding to high risk sectors.
Knowledge

To improve our knowledge:

  • we will commission research to evaluate construction design methods.
Support

To ensure small firms especially have the support they need we will:

  • continue to operate and monitor the programme of support, particularly for small firms, linked to the OHAC recommendations.

[back to top]

Work- related stress

Targets

The ten year indicators are to:

As we firm-up information about work-related stress we will seek to convert these indicators to targets.

Selected milestones for 2001/02

2.19 There are no interim targets in the three year period covered by this plan. This is because:

Baselines

2.20 We will be:

Programme of work

2001/02

Activity Description
Compliance

To improve compliance with the law we will:

  • draft first phase management standards for a range of key stressors and consult upon these initially through OHAC.
Continuous improvement

To promote best practice in the management of work-related stress we will:

  • identify best practice in work related stress;
  • identify best practice models for rehabilitation in stress cases;
  • identify beacons of excellence in preventing stress in schools, the NHS, local authorities and the private sector; and
  • set up five pilot (1 year) local bench marking groups to share good practice and "lay" knowledge about work-related stress in SMEs and between safety representatives.
Skills

To improve skills in the management of work-related stress we will:

  • promote the Cranfield University Business School resource pack Mental well-being in the workplace;
  • examine current best practice in inspection and produce revised guidance for inspectors; and
  • begin development of training materials for managers and safety representatives on how to carry out a stress risk assessment.
Support

To ensure necessary support and advice is in place we will:

  • publish revised guidance for employers; and
  • commence a second wave of guidance and promotion for National Stress Awareness Day 2001.

2002/03

Activity Description
Compliance

To support compliance with the law we will:

  • complete the consultation of the first phase management standards through OHAC; and
  • pilot the first phase management standards.
Continuous improvement

To continue work to promote best practice we will:

  • complete and prepare a report on the pilot of local bench marking groups; and
  • based on research results, publish information about best practice in prevention and rehabilitation for stress.
Knowledge

To improve knowledge on the management of stress we will:

  • carry out a qualitative evaluation of guidance which was published in year one;
  • continue research projects from year one; and
  • commission mid-term evaluation of the stress research programme.
Skills

To ensure everyone has the right skills to manage work related stress we will

  • continue development of training materials for managers and safety representatives on stress risk assessment.

2003/04

Activity Description
Compliance

To support compliance with the law we will:

  • review and if necessary revise the first phase management standards through OHAC; and
  • adopt first phase management standards through HSC.
Continuous improvement

To promote best practice we will:

  • publish a report on pilot local bench marking groups.
Knowledge

To increase our knowledge on work related stress we will:

  • continue research projects from years one and two; and
  • commission research to evaluate impact of the priority programme to date.
Skills

To ensure everyone has the right skills to manage work related stress we will:

  • publish and promote training materials for managers and safety representatives on stress risk assessment.
Support

To promote and support effective management of work related stress we will:

  • support the National Stress Awareness Day 2003; and
  • publish revised guidance (taking account of standards and further research findings).

[back to top]

Construction sector

Interim targets

Selected milestones for 2001/02

Baselines

2.21 The health and safety performance of the construction industry needs radical improvement. The fatal injury rate of 5.3 per 100 000 employees is some 7.5 times the all industry average and the industry has the largest number of fatal incidents to workers of any sector. Although long-term trends in incidents over the last decade have been downwards, construction remains one of the most dangerous industrial sectors. There are seldom less than 80 fatal incidents in a year; and there has been a recent reversal of the long term decline of worker fatal injury incidence rates. Most fatal injuries were caused by 'high falls' followed by 'struck by', 'transport' and 'collapses'. A number of members of the public die every year as a result of construction work, up to seven in recent years.

2.22 Major and over-3-day injury rates seem to have broadly plateaued. The causes of major injuries, averaged over the period 1995/6 to 1999/2000, show a fairly even division between 'other falls', high falls, struck by and 'trips'.

2.23 Occupational ill health is a further major cause for concern. The industry has: a significantly raised risk of injury from manual handling - one estimate suggesting that up to 30% of the construction workforce are affected; the second highest rate of new cases of Hand-Arm Vibration Syndrome (HAV); a high rate of allergic dermatitis from chromates in cement (an estimated 10% of bricklayers leave the industry after developing it); and as a mark of its continuing legacy from past exposures to asbestos, the highest rate of mesothelioma deaths.

2.24 The construction industry employs some 1.4 million people on site work. Around a further 200 000 people are employed in consultancies and professional work. There are some 160 000 firms, including a high proportion of small and medium sized enterprises (SME) and micro businesses. Site work is often transient and spread between many short term locations. However, some 25 major companies account for around one third of the total output.

2.25 Contractors, clients, designers and suppliers have particular roles to play in eliminating and reducing hazards and risks, and maintenance activities account for a significant proportion of fatal and major injuries.

Programme of work

2.26 Key elements will comprise:

2.27 The HSC's Construction Industry Advisory Committee (CONIAC) provides important advice to HSC on health and safety in construction and their advice will be valuable in the development of this programme.

2001/02

Activity Description
Compliance

To improve compliance with the law we will:

  • deliver the construction sector part of the Securing Compliance Programme through inspections, investigations and, where required, formal enforcement involving all those in the construction procurement and supply chain;
  • hold initiatives on safe working at heights initially including cross sector programmes aimed at clients and maintenance, scaffolding (worker & public safety), the use of scaffolding nets for industrial roofing and designing out fragile rooflights;
  • revise the ACOP on CDM Regulations;
  • hold enforcement campaigns to promote compliance in manual handling of building blocks and liaising with manufactures and suppliers to promote alternatives;
  • hold compliance initiatives on managing exposure to noise and hand arm vibration (HAVs) in hand tunnelling, scabbling and pile head removal, and on designing out the risk of HAVs; and
  • support the workplace transport priority programme.
Continuous improvement

To encourage continuous improvement we will:

  • monitor and review RHS targets agreed with CONIAC; and
  • follow up the February 2001 Construction Summit to ensure all construction 'umbrella' bodies have appropriate action plans and that these are being implemented by trades, professional bodies and duty holders.
Knowledge

To improve our knowledge we will project manage research on:

  • accident causation in construction;
  • work-related stress in the construction;
  • mapping health hazards and risks; and
  • major hazards in the construction industry.
Skills

To improve skills and competence we will:

  • support and stimulate initiatives to influence the formation of engineering, design and architectural professionals; and
  • carry forward proposals for pan-industry standards of assuring and assessing competence of all on site.
Support

To support health and safety in the construction industry we will:

  • support the 2nd Working Well Together (WWT) annual conference in European Health and Safety Week and the 2nd annual WWT awards and hold 2 promotional bus tours;
  • further develop the WWT web site to disseminate best practice and support action plans;
  • use publications such as WWT News to promulgate RHS programmes and Site Safe News to promote worker awareness of enforcement activities and good practice; and
  • develop and promote guidance on management of HAVS and occupational health and guidance on management of occupational health for SMEs;
  • facilitate development of effective occupational health support system for construction industry;
  • revise HS(G)150, targeting SMEs especially high risk trades and make this available on the WWT website; and
  • support a pilot Workers Safety Adviser initiative in construction.

2002/03

Activity Description
Compliance

To improve compliance with the law we will:

  • deliver the construction sector contribution to the Securing Compliance Programme through inspections, investigations and, where required, formal enforcement involving all those in the construction procurement and supply chain;
  • review cross-sector maintenance and scaffolding initiatives and refocus as progress is made, and continue priority action on use of nets during industrial roofing;
  • review CDM Regulations and Construction Health, Safety and Welfare Regulations (CHSW);
  • continue enforcement campaigns on work with heavy blocks and extend to other products (liaising with manufacturers and suppliers);
  • extend compliance initiatives on noise and HAVs to other high risk activities (eg. roadbreakers); and
  • review and develop initiatives on workplace transport safety.
Continuous improvement

To encourage continuous improvement we will:

  • monitor and review the delivery of action plans following the February 2001 Construction Summit.
Knowledge

We will continue to monitor the delivery of our strategy to improve intelligence on health and safety performance in the construction industry. We will also:

  • review accident investigation procedures in light of the outcomes of research; and
  • evaluate research into work related stress in construction.
Skills

We will continue work from year one to:

  • influence the formation of engineering, design and architectural professionals; and
  • support pan-industry strategy for accreditation of all on site.
Support

To support health and safety in the construction industry we will continue to support the CONIAC-WWT campaign and other methods to promote worker awareness and good practice.

2003/04

Activity Description
Compliance

To improve compliance with the law we will:

  • deliver the construction sectors part of the Securing Compliance Programme through: inspections, investigations and, where required, formal enforcement involving all those in the construction procurement and supply chain;
  • review the cross-sector maintenance and falls initiatives and refocus as progress is made;
  • continue priority action on use of nets during industrial roofing;
  • complete the review of CDM and CHSW Regulations;
  • continue enforcement campaigns on work with heavy blocks and extend to other construction products (liaising with manufacturers and suppliers);
  • continue to extend compliance initiatives on noise and HAVs to include other high risk activities (eg roadbreakers); and
  • continue to develop initiatives on workplace transport safety.
Continuous improvement

To support continuous improvement we will:

  • monitor the achievement of targets and review our strategy; and
  • review action plans produced following February 2001 summit with key umbrella bodies and significant other intermediaries and duty holders.
Knowledge

We will continue to monitor the delivery of our strategy to improve intelligence on health and safety performance in the construction industry.

Skills

To improve skills we will continue work from years one and two to:

  • influence the formation of engineering/design and architectural professionals; and
  • support accreditation of construction site trades.
Support

To support health and safety in the construction industry we will continue to support the CONIAC WWT campaign and other methods to promote worker awareness and good practice.

[back to top]

Agricultural sector

Interim Targets

Selected milestones for 2001/02

Baselines

2.28 Health and safety in the agricultural sector is characterised by the following:

Programme of work

2.29 The programme consists of work to :

2.30 All are inter-related and a number depend on the changes to legislation. The Agricultural Industry Advisory Committee (AIAC), which advises HSC on health and safety in agriculture, will be an important mechanism for supporting a partnership approach to the development of this strategy.

2.31 To deal with these areas of work the industry can be divided into four categories:

2001/02

Activity Description
Compliance

To improve compliance with the law we will:

  • review relevant regulations eg the Prevention of Accidents to Children in Agriculture Regulations in consultation with other Government Departments (OGDs) and industry and develop new legislative and other approaches to respond to certain types of fatal and serious incidents in the industry;
  • arrange for access to the Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) database for targeting interventions and investigate the use of OGD contacts who visit farms to work as partners in achieving RHS targets;
  • develop audit inspection techniques for GROUP A premises, concentrating on HSE's priority inspection programmes and RHS programmes with enforcement as appropriate;
  • target blitz inspections at GROUP B on a seasonal and work basis and related to priority programmes such as WRMSD, transport, falls from heights and other RHS programmes based on local knowledge;
  • develop voluntary self-assessment audits for GROUP B & C premises, visiting premises not returning audits;
  • investigate specific incidents and ill health related to RHS targets and priority compliance programmes with enforcement as appropriate; and
  • target visits to ensure designated equipment and machines which contribute to the number of fatal and major injuries in the industry are safe when supplied.
Continuous improvement

To promote continuous improvement and good practice we will:

  • produce an integrated agriculture RHS strategy and agree with OGD's, AIAC and the industry;
  • organise a high level conference in 2001 with OGD's, AIAC and key players in the industry on actions to deliver targets and sharing agendas;
  • organise an "internal" seminar for government departments with an interest in health and safety in agriculture to follow up on sharing agendas; and
  • work with AIAC, local authorities and key intermediaries to agree targets and work for RHS on relevant topics.
Knowledge

To improve our knowledge we will:

  • produce blackspot reports relevant to targets on transport and falls from heights; and
  • evaluate the success of the SAD held in 2001/02, jointly sponsored by National Farmers Union (NFU) Mutual and LANTRA and supported by NFU and Transport & General Workers Union (TGWU).
Skills

To improve skills and awareness we will:

  • continue with SADs for GROUP C premises concentrating on HSE's priority inspection programmes and RHS targets.

  • organise a SAD for GROUP C (forestry workers, machinery rings, machinery dealers and gangmasters) concentrating on RHS targets;
  • encourage industry led and sponsored joint NFU/TGWU SAD for employers and employees;
  • agree training initiatives in the industry with the NTO linked to the RHS targets; and
  • work with Agricultural Colleges and Universities to improve health and safety management of students and health and safety knowledge of designers of machinery and agree course content.
Support

To ensure the right support systems are in place we will:

  • work to ensure CEN standards on designated equipment such as trailers, sprayers, ladders etc are suitable in respect of current UK standards;
  • explore with industry and the NHS the development of rural/agricultural occupational health advice service concentrating on WRMSD and dust;
  • organise advertising campaigns, press launches and exhibitions at relevant agricultural shows to increase knowledge of preventative measures relating to RHS targets; and
  • produce relevant publication and internet advice on RHS topics and targets.

2002/03

Activity Description
Compliance

To promote compliance with the law we will:

  • arrange for the use of the DEFRA database to target HSE inspections in the industry;
  • continue the review of relevant legislation and take forward any actions in consultation with industry and other stakeholders;
  • audit a number of Group A premises;
  • carry out further targeted inspections of Group B premises;
  • if self assessment audits prove feasible organise a structured pilot;
  • continue investigations of specified incidents and ill health related to RHS targets;
  • carry out visits to ensure designated machinery is safe when supplied; and
  • arrange for the enforcement of any new mandatory requirements enacted as part of targeted inspections.
Continuous improvement

To promote continuous improvement and good practice we will:

  • take forward an integrated RHS strategy;
  • take forward actions arising from high level conference and from sharing agendas with stakeholders;
  • possible follow up conference to report on progress; and
  • continue work with IACs, local authorities and key intermediaries.
Knowledge

To improve our knowledge we will:

  • identify and develop suitable evaluation techniques; and
  • complete blackspot reports.
Skills

To improve skills we will continue training initiatives identified during 2001/02 and:

  • continue to work with Agricultural Colleges and Universities on course content; and
  • continue SADs in partnership with others and evaluate success of events held during 2001/02 subject to resources.
Support

Subject to sufficient support we will set up dedicated occupational health support pilot projects for industry, we will also:

  • evaluate the success of advertising campaigns launched in 2001/02 and develop further campaigns linked to RHS priority programmes;
  • produce relevant publications to support health and safety in agriculture; and
  • publish CEN Standards on designated equipment.

2003/04

Activity Description
Compliance

To promote compliance with the law we will:

  • monitor implementation of revised legislation where necessary;
  • evaluate success of use of OGD intermediaries;
  • continue auditing of group A premises and begin evaluation of 2002/03 activity;
  • continue targeted inspections of Group B premises and arrange evaluation of activity in 2002/03;
  • evaluate self assessment pilot exercises;
  • continue investigation of specified accident and ill health incidents;
  • carry out further visits to ensure designated machinery is safe when supplied and evaluate activity carried out in 2002/03; and
  • continue and evaluate enforcement of new mandatory requirements.
Continuous improvement

To promote continuous improvement and best practice we will:

  • monitor progress of integrated strategy and develop evaluation procedures; and
  • evaluate success of work with IACs, LAs and other intermediaries.
Skills

To improve skills and competence in managing health and safety we will:

  • hold further safety awareness days where these are successful; and
  • implement findings arising from assessment of course content of Agricultural Colleges and Universities.
Support

To ensure effectiveness of support systems we will:

  • evaluate the occupational health support pilots and extend to other parts of country where feasible;
  • continue advertising campaigns where successful; and
  • continue publications as necessary.

[back to top]

Health services sector

Interim targets

Health Ministers have set performance targets for NHS English Regions:

Selected milestones for 2001/02

2.32 The National Assembly of Wales (NAW) has accepted the RHS targets. It plans to benchmark the performance of the Welsh NHS trusts in 2001, before considering more demanding targets. It will also assess the Health and Safety management systems of its trusts using equivalent standards to those in England.

2.33 Scottish Trusts will have to record a minimum dataset on occupational health and safety from 31 March 2001, and have been set a target of a 25% reduction in Reporting of Injuries Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations (RIDDOR) reportable incidents and diseases by 2006. Monitoring arrangements and implementation programmes are currently being developed.

2.34 HSC with the support of the Health Services Advisory Committee (HSAC) intends to work with the NHS on the basis that their existing and emerging targets and programmes will make a substantial contribution to reducing health and safety failures. HSC will seek to ensure that the private sector also develops suitable targets aimed at securing the improvements required.

Baselines

2.35 About 1.1 million people are employed in the NHS in England, Wales and Scotland. Some of the main occupations (especially nurses and ambulance crews) have extremely high rates of incidents and sickness absence resulting from: manual handling (mainly of patients), slips and trips, violence, and stress. Current initiatives in the NHS will provide an opportunity for HSE to work with the NHS quality improvement programmes to embed targets, monitor performance and secure improvements. The NHS data would also assist HSE in targeting its interventions.

2.36 The NHS in England and Wales is auditing Health and Safety Management as part of its Controls Assurance system. By April 2001, each Region and the National Assembly will have trust action plans for improvement derived from baseline assessments carried out in 2000. NHS in Scotland is currently developing an audit system and improvement programmes as part of its Occupational Health and Safety Strategy.

Programme of work

2.37 Key elements of the programme comprise:

2.38 In 2001/02 each of the eight NHS Regions plus Wales and Scotland will be allocated an HSE operational contact for collaborative working. Key objectives will include: the assessment of performance information; the identification of priorities; the setting of suitable trust-specific targets; the scrutiny of trust action plans to ensure the required outcomes are delivered; and the provision of HSE support to assist NHS management implement change programmes. In support of this, HSE will concentrate its preventive inspection programme for 2001/2 on action being taken in both the NHS and the private sector on manual handling and violence to staff. Poor performers will be identified and appropriate enforcement action will be taken.

2.39 Links will be made between this priority programme and an LA programme on patient handling in residential homes.

2001/02

Activity Description
Compliance

To improve compliance we will:

  • support the NHS Central Approach;
  • ensure all NHS Regions have suitable targets and action plans for each Trust, providing HSE support as appropriate;
  • develop and agree similar programmes and targets for Wales and Scotland;
  • agree a memorandum of understanding with the Care Standards Commission (CSC); and
  • carry out compliance based interventions on manual handling, and violence at 40 targeted NHS Trusts, and 200 Registered Nursing Homes (RNH).
Continuous improvement

To promote continuous improvement we will:

  • identify examples of good practice in managing violence;
  • identify examples of good practice in patient handling (including the Ambulance Service); and
  • develop with HSAC targets and monitoring systems for the private sector.
Knowledge

To improve our knowledge and data collection we will:

  • develop programmes to improve knowledge on manual handling and violence in the private sector;
  • identify the main underlying causes of slips/ trips in healthcare, and assess the need for research and sector specific guidance;
  • identify linkages from visits on management of violence to outcomes from research on work-related stress;
  • identify and follow up specific actions from the research report on managing stress in the NHS, expected mid 2001;
  • use Open University research to devise a ready reckoner for the costs of incidents/ill health in the NHS; and
  • pursue research on cost/benefit of health and safety management in the NHS.
Skills

We will develop programmes to improve skills to manage manual handling and violence in the private sector.

2002/03

Activity Description
Compliance

We will continue to support the NHS Central approach including:

  • using emerging data to monitor performance and target HSE action, co-operating with NHS audit functions in respect of poor performers;
  • continuing visits to poor performers on management of violence and manual handling; and
  • interventions in Trusts, on slips and trips.

We will work with Welsh and Scottish Trusts to ensure they have suitable targets and action plans.

In the private sector we will:

  • review HSE's programme of inspection with CSC and target accordingly;
  • target further visits to RNHs on management of violence and manual handling; and
  • carry out interventions on slips and trips in Registered Nursing Homes.
Continuous improvement

To support continuous improvement we will:

  • work with intermediaries to promulgate examples of good practice in the management of violence and in manual handling; and
  • identify and promote good practice examples in management of work related stress.
Knowledge

to improve our knowledge of the management of health and safety we will:

  • establish the number of trusts with a stress policy, and arrangements for monitoring stress-related ill-health absences;
  • review the contribution of supply chain factors (eg design) and of contractors to securing safe workplaces; and
  • develop and agree tools for measuring costs of incidents and ill health with NHS.
Support

To ensure necessary support and information is in place we will:

  • run a slips and trips awareness raising campaign eg through the relevant trade press;
  • promote existing generic or new Health Services Sector guidance on slips and trips; and
  • publish HSAC guidance on work related stress.

2003/04

Activity Description
Compliance

We will continue to support the NHS Central approach, including:

  • fine tuning compliance activity into areas with the greatest need/potential for improvement;
  • co-operating with NHS audit functions in respect of poor performers; and
  • conducting follow up evaluation visits and further visits to poor performers on manual handling and management of violence.

In the private sector we will:

  • carry out further visits to RNHs and selected private hospitals/ ambulance operators on manual handling and management of violence; and
  • conduct interventions in private hospitals and nursing homes on slips and trips.
Knowledge
  • We will assess the outcome of the Central NHS approach and consider need for further investment needs and future strategy; and
  • We will assess effectiveness of slips and trips interventions and awareness campaign via further analysis of RIDDOR.
Support We will continue work from years one and two and will:
  • promote and establish awareness of HSAC guidance on work-related stress.

[back to top]

Slips and trips

Interim targets

Selected milestones for 2001/02

Baselines

2.40 Slips and trips account for the largest number of injuries in the LA enforced sector and are therefore a priority hazard for this sector. Slips and trips are also a significant cause of accidents in the HSE enforced sector and HSE inspectors will contribute at a later date to this priority programme where they have enforcement responsibility. This programme will have benefits for both employees and members of the public. Targeted work will ensure a greater understanding of accident causation in the LA enforced sector with targeted guidance for LAs to enable them to make an impact in this area.

2.41 LAs will focus enforcement activity to ensure compliance with the law and to provide advice on compliance where this is necessary. Action will also be taken to develop a detailed understanding of the causation of slips and trips and the development of case studies within high risk LA enforced workplaces. The details of actions to fulfil this priority programme in the LA enforced sector will be agreed through HELA. Examples of some of the activities that will take place are given below.

Programmes of work

2001/02

Activity Description
Compliance

To promote compliance with the law, LAs will:

  • focus inspection activity on slips and trips, especially in sectors with known high incidence rates.
Knowledge

To improve our knowledge on slips and trips we will work with LAs to:

  • carry out research into causation and risk communication to inform future targeted activity;
  • conduct a detailed study of all slip and trip incidents reported for the LA enforced sector and use the findings from this study to inform 'real workplace case studies' in LA enforced industries/employers; and
  • under the Health Services Priority Programme HSE will identify the main underlying causes of slips, trips and falls in healthcare, and assess the need for research and sector specific guidance.
Skills

to improve skills in managing slips and trips we will work with LAs to:

  • provide training courses for local authority inspectors.
Support

To develop appropriate support systems we will work with LAs to:

  • pilot the HSE/HSL Pedestrian Slipping Expert System to support: enforcement officers and the industry;
  • develop a publicity strategy including case studies; and
  • promote existing HSE Guidance and the HSE video Stop Slips

2002/03

Activity Description
Compliance

LAs will continue to focus enforcement activity on slips and trips in high risk sectors. HSE will also:

  • launch specific targeted activity in the HSE enforced sector; and
  • carry out interventions to reduce levels of slips and trips in the Health Services Sector.
Knowledge

Working with LAs, we will:

  • continue research programmes from year one;
  • monitor and evaluate take up and effective use of HSE/HSL Pedestrian Slipping Expert System; and
  • review the impact of the priority programme and research to inform future targeting.
Skills

Working with LAs, we will:

  • continue training for enforcement officers from year one; and
  • develop training package for dutyholders and safety representatives.
Support

To provide necessary support to reduce slips and trips we will work with LAs to:

  • make available the HSE/HSL Pedestrian Slipping Expert System to all LAs from April 2002 to assist in enforcement;
  • disseminate the outcome of research findings and real life case studies; and
  • commence a publicity programme backed up by sector specific guidance.

2003/04

Activity Description
Compliance

To improve compliance with the law LAs and HSE will continue targeted action in high risk areas.

Knowledge

To improve our knowledge on slips and trips we will work with LAs to:

  • continue research programmes from years one and two; and
  • continue to evaluate the impact of the programme in key sectors.
Skills

We will work with LAs to:

  • continue training activity for enforcement officers; and
  • run training workshops for duty holders and safety representatives.
Support

To ensure necessary support systems we will work with LAs to:

  • develop the HSE/HSL Pedestrian Slipping Expert System and make it available to a wider audience; and
  • continue the publicity programme.
Updated 2012-01-17